Prison for the Rincón de la Victoria brothel gang

The rooms where the victims slept / ON

The police investigation revealed that the organization was working under the guise of a tourist accommodation company to conceal the economic activity

Irene Quirante

It all happened in a villa in Rincón de la Victoria which, from the outside, did not look like a brothel. However, it was little more than a prison for the more than 300 women who, for five years, were forced into prostitution for 21 days straight and 24 hours a day without rest.

The national police arrested twenty people at different stages of the investigation for their involvement in crimes of human trafficking, drug trafficking, money laundering and criminal organization. At the end of May 2021, the first nine arrests took place and the justice ordered the imprisonment of eight of those allegedly involved in the network.

In July this year, the last arrests took place, dismantling a criminal organization. The agents had been following them for two years, suspecting that they were sexually exploiting the victims in the house, which was incorporated as a club with a turnover much higher than the majority of the province of Malaga. Over the past five years, it has achieved a turnover of more than 1,280,000 euros.

Mainly South American

According to the sources consulted, the women who stayed in the house had to be available 24 hours a day and were mostly foreign, especially from South American countries. Most of them were living illegally in Spain.

Victims were also forced to be drug “enablers”; mainly cocaine and Viagra, which were obtained, processed and distributed by the same organization.

The police investigation revealed that the organization was working under the false identity of a tourist accommodation company to conceal the economic activity derived from sexual exploitation and the sale of drugs in the Rincón brothel.

To this end, the alleged ringleader and his closest aides set up a company which they would later expand with two other front companies. In this way, they channeled the payments they received at the point-of-sale (POS) terminals installed in the club to the bank accounts of the main company.

In this way, the investigators concluded, they managed to invoice more than 1,280,000 euros in five years. This money, in turn, would have been used to simulate the purchase of goods and services between the three companies.

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