Spain Province – FYL UNEX http://fyl-unex.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 02:45:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://fyl-unex.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Spain Province – FYL UNEX http://fyl-unex.com/ 32 32 Vietnam hosts international symposium on volcanic caves https://fyl-unex.com/vietnam-hosts-international-symposium-on-volcanic-caves/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 00:56:57 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/vietnam-hosts-international-symposium-on-volcanic-caves/ Foreign delegates attending the 20th International Symposium on Volcanic Caves. (Photo: baovanhoa.vn) In his opening speech on November 22, Vietnamese Minister of Natural Resources and Environment Tran Hong Ha noted that since it was first held in 1972 in Hawaii, the ISV has become an important event for experts and international scientists in the field […]]]>
Foreign delegates attending the 20th International Symposium on Volcanic Caves. (Photo: baovanhoa.vn)

In his opening speech on November 22, Vietnamese Minister of Natural Resources and Environment Tran Hong Ha noted that since it was first held in 1972 in Hawaii, the ISV has become an important event for experts and international scientists in the field of volcanic caves to exchange information, research results and experiences in managing and promoting the value of natural heritage for humanity.

Vietnam is proud to host the symposium for the first time alongside countries rich in volcanic cave resources such as Spain, Ecuador, Italy, Australia, Republic of Korea, Jordan, India Iceland and the United States, he said.

Ha expected the 20th ISV to help strengthen cooperation and mutual understanding among countries in the region on the conservation and sustainable use of geological heritages, including geological parks.

Christian Manhart, Chief Representative of UNESCO in Vietnam, expressed UNESCO’s commitment to strongly support international cooperation in order to effectively implement the Sustainable Development Goals in general and to respond to climate change and protect biodiversity and geology in particular.

UNESCO has supported more than 60 international projects, led by 379 geologists from 92 countries, he said, adding that the UNESCO Geoparks programme, which recognizes geological heritage of international significance, has experienced rapid growth since its creation in 2015 by UNESCO Member States.

vietnam hosts international volcanic cave symposium photo 2
Presentation of flowers to UNESCO representatives during the symposium.

The UNESCO official expressed his belief that the exchange activities to be held in the coming days in Dak Nong will help promote cooperation between UNESCO and geologists for the conservation and sustainable use of volcanoes and volcanic caves towards the Sustainable Development Goals and the United Nations Development Program – Agenda 2030.

The symposia are expected to last for five days, with main and side activities including field trips to several volcanic caves in the Dak Nong UNESCO Global Geopark, where more than 50 volcanic caves have been identified and explored.

Dak Nong UNESCO Global Geopark is the largest and most rigorous volcanic cave system in Southeast Asia. More interestingly, there is ample evidence of prehistoric human settlements inside several caves – an exceptionally rare phenomenon in the world.

Source: VOV

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The Medieval Italian Ham America Missed https://fyl-unex.com/the-medieval-italian-ham-america-missed/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 12:49:00 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/the-medieval-italian-ham-america-missed/ The flavor of culatello is not something that can be identified or described without invoking words like musky or smoky or downright fleeting, like Flavor Is. Locals in the Zibello area say it tastes like fog. However, unless you plan to visit one of the eight villages that produce this quality ham, you will have […]]]>

The flavor of culatello is not something that can be identified or described without invoking words like musky or smoky or downright fleeting, like Flavor Is. Locals in the Zibello area say it tastes like fog. However, unless you plan to visit one of the eight villages that produce this quality ham, you will have no idea what the Po fog tastes like. It’s anomalies like these that make culatello different from any other charcuterie. Outwardly, its color resembles that of a spanish hambut once sliced, the culatello has the texture of thin bacon and dissolves in the mouth as such.

Culatello is served mainly as a starter, a bit like a salami or prosciutto. According Italian food, the culatello is served thinly sliced ​​with toasted bread. The favorite bread is the special gnocco fritto, unique to Emilia-Romagna. This bread is a simple mixture of water, flour, salt, and baking soda that has been shaped into squares and fried in lard. Culatello should be served at room temperature to achieve that melt-in-your-mouth texture, but can be stored in the fridge for two to three days if properly wrapped.

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! Murcia today – The city of Murcia is already installing its Christmas lights https://fyl-unex.com/murcia-today-the-city-of-murcia-is-already-installing-its-christmas-lights/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 09:11:55 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/murcia-today-the-city-of-murcia-is-already-installing-its-christmas-lights/ Publication date: 09/11/2022 The city and surrounding areas began installing their lights early, but for the second year in a row there will be no trees in the Plaza Circular The luminaire installation company installs a total of 1,223 decorative elements, including arches, signs, cones, stars and other special patterns, and 2,908 meters of LED […]]]>

Publication date: 09/11/2022

The city and surrounding areas began installing their lights early, but for the second year in a row there will be no trees in the Plaza Circular

The luminaire installation company installs a total of 1,223 decorative elements, including arches, signs, cones, stars and other special patterns, and 2,908 meters of LED lights in garlands , distributed throughout the municipality. The total cost of the project is 2,116,467 euros.

When will the Christmas lights be on in the city of Murcia 2022?

The Deputy Mayor and Councilor for Infrastructure, Procurement and Development, Mario Gómez, will meet in the coming days with merchants and neighborhood associations to agree on the date for lighting and extinguishing these fires.

The objective is to reduce energy consumption by 15% and therefore public expenditure as well. Mario Gómez, however, said that “this issue will be discussed with neighbors and merchants to see if they consider it appropriate and a joint decision will be made”.

Another thing that the town hall wants to try this year in terms of energy saving is to rotate the designs and the lights in the city so that it looks different from previous years, but with the material resources already available.

The Plaza Circular in Murcia is again without a Christmas tree

While the lights come on nice and early, for the second year in a row, that doesn’t include the installation of the large Christmas tree in the Plaza Circular. This is due to a contract issue with the decoration company, as the installation of the tree is not included in this.

The streets of the capital that have their Christmas lights installed are: Comandante Mariano Tejera, Cronista Valcárcel, Batalla de las Flores, Paseo Marqués de los Vélez, Ronda de Levante, Plaza de San Antolín, calle Virgen de la Esperanza, Escultor Roque López , Junterones, Plaza de Santa Eulalia, calle Cánovas del Castillo, Correos, Floridablanca, Plano San Francisco, Teniente Flomesta, Puente Viejo, calle Canalejas, Princesa, calle Cartagena, Paseo Marqués de Corvera, calle Santa Teresa, calle Madre de Dios, Jara Carrillo, Gutiérrez Mellado, Jaime I, Avenida Constitución and the streets in the center of the capital, Jabonerías and Calle Sociedad.

With regard to the peripheral pedanías of the central municipality of Murcia, the Christmas lights have already been installed in: Algezares, Beniaján, Casillas, El Raal, Llano de Brujas, Puente Tocinos, Santa Cruz, Churra, El Puntal, La Ñora, Aljucer, Barqueros, Cañada Hermosa, Puebla de Soto, San Ginés, Sangonera la Seca, Sangonera la Verde, Algezares, Barrio del Progreso, Beniaján, Los Garres, San Pio X, Baños y Mendigo, Cañadas de San Pedro and Sucine.

Images: Ayuntamiento de Murcia

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The Spanish Civil Guard seizes “the largest marijuana reserve discovered” https://fyl-unex.com/the-spanish-civil-guard-seizes-the-largest-marijuana-reserve-discovered/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 19:44:37 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/the-spanish-civil-guard-seizes-the-largest-marijuana-reserve-discovered/ The Spanish Civil Guard seized the largest amount of cannabis ever found in a series of drug raids across the country, police say. “The Civil Guard has seized the largest cache of packaged marijuana found to date,” the Spanish Civil Guard said in a press release in Spanish. “Operation Jardines concluded with the seizure of […]]]>

The Spanish Civil Guard seized the largest amount of cannabis ever found in a series of drug raids across the country, police say.

“The Civil Guard has seized the largest cache of packaged marijuana found to date,” the Spanish Civil Guard said in a press release in Spanish. “Operation Jardines concluded with the seizure of 32,370.2 kilograms of marijuana buds, the largest seizure of this substance, not only in Spain, but also internationally.”

Police said twenty people were arrested, all of whom were part of a larger organization that controlled drug production and distribution. The organization would have offices in Toledo, Ciudad Real, Valencia and Asturias.

The organization transported the drug under vacuum throughout Spain and other European countries, including Switzerland, Holland, Germany and Belgium.

CUSTOMS AND BORDER PATROL OFFICERS SEIZE $18.6M IN METH AT TEXAS PORT OF ENTRY: ‘EXCEPTIONAL DRUG LOSS’

country, police say. “/>

Spain’s Civil Guard has seized the largest shipment of cannabis ever found in a series of anti-drug raids across the country, police say.
(Credit: Guardia Civil via Storyful)

The press release indicates that the investigation began when the Civil Guard began inspecting several industrial sites hemp plantations in Villacañas (Toledo). The main individuals involved in the investigation owned a company through which they acquired the hemp seeds, while a second entity transported and planted them, according to the statement.

CALIFORNIA BUST NETS 2.2 TONS OF METH AND COCAINE WORTH $24 MILLION AT SAN DIEGO PORT OF ENTRY

Officers then discovered 37,000 plants spread across four greenhouses during a second inspection in October in Almagro (Ciudad Real). Three individuals on site have been arrested. The Civil Guard also found four tons of cannabis stored on board a ship en route to two warehouses in Valencia.

Police said twenty people were arrested, all of whom were part of a larger organization that controlled drug production and distribution.

Police said twenty people were arrested, all of whom were part of a larger organization that controlled drug production and distribution.
(Credit: Guardia Civil via Storyful)

The Civil Guard reached “30,530 kilos of buds, 20 kilos of pollen – all vacuum packed – 21,600 plants being dried and 231,200 packages of marijuana buds” in the last province. The police reported having found documents confirming the activities of other plantations also involved in the production of cannabis.

The Civil Guard reached

The Civil Guard reached “30,530 kilos of buds, 20 kilos of pollen -all vacuum-packed-, 21,600 plants being dried and 231,200 packages of marijuana buds” in the last province.
(Credit: Guardia Civil via Storyful)

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Fox News Digital reached out to the Spanish Civil Guard for additional comment, but did not hear back in time for publication.

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Here’s why you should think about moving to Alicante https://fyl-unex.com/heres-why-you-should-think-about-moving-to-alicante/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 10:06:48 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/heres-why-you-should-think-about-moving-to-alicante/ The province of Alicante in Spain has seen an increasing number of British pensioners settling there, as it is an ideal haven for relocation. Warm weather, a relaxed lifestyle, delicious cuisine and a friendly culture are just some of the benefits that a move to Alicante can offer. Due to its excellent public health system, […]]]>

The province of Alicante in Spain has seen an increasing number of British pensioners settling there, as it is an ideal haven for relocation.

Warm weather, a relaxed lifestyle, delicious cuisine and a friendly culture are just some of the benefits that a move to Alicante can offer. Due to its excellent public health system, around 6 million immigrants decide to move to Spain and live in Alicante.

There are a few places in particular that British pensioners love in Alicante, which has long been a popular expat destination. The high number of retirees already living in Spain is proof that many people enjoy moving to Alicante.

According to the law firm MyVisaSpainthe Consulates of Spain in the United Kingdom are overworked because there are many retirees who need their non-profit visa live in Spain.

Here are some additional considerations as to why moving to Alicante is so appealing.

Climate

With 300 days of sunshine a year, Alicante will appeal to you if you want a summer environment all year round. It’s understandable why so many people choose to leave the colder temperatures of the UK behind in favor of a climate that promotes well-being, with health benefits associated with living in a warmer climate.

Retiring in Alicante is the best option if you don’t intend to slow down during your retirement, as the pleasant weather creates additional options for outdoor activities. The good climate goes hand in hand with beautiful landscapes and the surrounding towns such as Santa Bárbara have very spectacular and relaxing views of the city of Alicante.

Cost of life

In general, property prices on the Costa Blanca are cheaper to buy than in the UK, and Alicante is a reasonably priced city. Compared to UK cities, the cost of living in spain is lower. Buying property in Spain is cheaper for expats in Alicante. The greater financial security that comes with lower living expenses is a welcome relief for the expat community.

Air travel is a consideration for anyone moving to Alicante. It is important to be able to return by plane to your country of origin. Alicante Airport is an international airport and has many daily flights to destinations all over the world. The city of Alicante also has metro systems for public transport. As a result, expats have access to a world-class transportation system.

Health care in Spain for pensioners

The high caliber of healthcare services in Spain ensures that moving to Alicante will not compromise your access. Both private and public health care are part of the health care system. Hospitals and clinics that provide public and private health care are available and plentiful. Additionally, Spain ranks 19th in the Euro Consumer Health Index.

Requirements to retire in Alicante

Spain joined the European Union in 1985 and has been a member of the Schengen region since 1995. This implies that retiring in the country is quite straightforward for EU members. You can live and retire there without a visa if you are an EU citizen.

Non-EU citizens can apply for different types of Spanish visas:

  • retirement visafor people who only want to retire in Spain.
  • Golden Visafor people who have invested €500,000 in real estate.
  • student visapeople who want to do a course in Spain.
  • Non-Profit Spanish Visapeople who wish to live in Spain without working, this option is ideal for British pensioners who wish to retire in Spain.

Depending on the type of visa you are applying for, Spain has different visa requirements. First, you have to prove that you can survive in Spanish cities without work. Generally, you must prove a minimum monthly income of 2,130 euros.

Moving to Alicante won’t slow down your child’s education with UK schools also available in the area. The world class service you will receive will ensure you never miss your home. Enjoy a wonderful moment of retirement in the Iberian Peninsula without worrying about the world.

This article was brought to you by MySpanishVisa.com and does not necessarily represent the views of The Herald

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Loss and damage to cultural heritage is ignored. This must change at COP27. https://fyl-unex.com/loss-and-damage-to-cultural-heritage-is-ignored-this-must-change-at-cop27/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 19:28:29 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/loss-and-damage-to-cultural-heritage-is-ignored-this-must-change-at-cop27/ The loss and damage caused by climate change to intangible cultural heritage such as indigenous and local knowledge and traditional agricultural practices have been largely underestimated in discussions on the implementation of the Paris Agreement. This must change. A new report from the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change)published ahead of COP27 and co-authored with […]]]>

The loss and damage caused by climate change to intangible cultural heritage such as indigenous and local knowledge and traditional agricultural practices have been largely underestimated in discussions on the implementation of the Paris Agreement. This must change.

A new report from the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change)published ahead of COP27 and co-authored with UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) and ICOMOS (the International Council on Monuments and Sites) underlined for the first time in the history of the scientific panel, the vital importance of the protection of cultural heritage in the fight against climate change.

Impacts on cultural heritage underestimated

The lack of attention given to cultural heritage has resulted in a global imbalance in the comprehensive understanding of the impacts of climate change. This, in turn, has led to an incomplete understanding of non-economic loss and damage. Additionally, climate responses, both practical and political, are seen and implemented through a cultural lens. The way people perceive, understand and respond to climate impacts is intricately modulated by culture and heritage. Understanding what people value and prioritize in their own cultural contexts can be a powerful factor in designing and implementing effective strategies to limit harmful heat-trapping emissions and help communities adapt to inevitable impacts. .

The IPCC has found that the lack of a comprehensive and balanced understanding of cultural heritage in climate risk assessments has been exacerbated by an over-representation of built heritage and well-known sites in climate and heritage policy discussions. Wealth consists not only of tangible assets such as buildings, monuments, archaeological sites, works of art and museums, but also intangible heritage. This heritage, transmitted and developed from generation to generation over decades or even millennia, can include practices, food traditions, languages, skills, ceremonies, artistic expressions, cosmologies, identities and fashions. of knowledge. This intangible heritage often resides in communities that have been historically marginalized, discriminated against or actively persecuted – those who are also often the most vulnerable to climate change.

Traditional resilience practices of the past can build resilience today

Much of this threatened and vulnerable intangible heritage provides opportunities to learn from climate adaptation in the past and build resilience in the future. For example, the pastoral systems used by nomadic peoples in Africa, who follow or drive their livestock to suitable open pastures, developed as effective responses to the natural aridification of much of the continent thousands of years ago. ‘years. Ancient water access and management practices also have much to contribute today. Complex irrigation systems such as the acequia from Spain and New Mexico, the aflaj from Oman and those from Peru Nor Yauyos Cochos Reserve and Honghe Hani Rice Terraces in the Chinese province of Yunnan have enabled the agriculture of arid lands and mountains for centuries, even millennia. In Nepal, the underground running water system and public fountains (hiti) dating from the 6th century provide access to water to a large part of the population of the entire Kathmandu valley.

The IPCC report emphasizes the importance of recognizing the different ways of knowing and the various knowledge systems at play in understanding, measuring, monitoring and recording. Seasonal phenomena, for example, are important in triggering or celebrating agricultural, fishing or hunting activities in the annual calendars of many indigenous peoples, often accompanied by ceremonies. In Oregon, the Siletz people take advantage of the emergence of eel ants (flying termites) and other environmental cues to trigger their harvest of Pacific lampreys and simultaneously the traditional eel dance. In addition to climate change, there are changes in the seasons, phenology (seasonal biological changes directly linked to climatic conditions), the disconnection of ecological phenomena linked to history and alterations in the distribution of species. For the Native Alaskan Iñupiat, bowhead whale hunting and the spring whaling festival have been an integral part of community identity for thousands of years, but climate change in the marine environment Arctic threaten this.

Eel Dance of the Yakama Nation. McKayla Lee / Highlighted News

Indigenous knowledge should be highly valued

Often, indigenous and local communities are the first to notice changes in ecological phenomena, as their detailed traditional knowledge of the interactions between local species and weather has been built up over many generations of observation and cultural interaction. . The three main types of knowledge – scientific, indigenous and local – should not be merged into a single hybrid system, but should be used alongside each other in a braided knowledge system take full advantage of different systems and perspectives.

Indigenous knowledge has too often been absorbed and integrated into science-based impact and adaptation strategies, without the full participation of the knowledge holders themselves. The same is true at decision-making and political levels, where indigenous and local communities have not had the platform to speak for themselves, rather than being mediated by the voices of others. They have most often lacked access to decision-making and climate action planning, and adaptation plans are the poorest of these – lacking key knowledge, ideas and toolkits. practical tools. Traditional knowledge has also been hand-picked or appropriate and the IPCC states that:

“When pursuing research/collaborative work across knowledge systems, it is essential to be clear about data sharing and benefit sharing agreements so that IPRs (Intellectual Property Rights) are maintained, that consent is transparent and that groups (e.g. Indigenous Peoples and local communities) are in no way disadvantaged by giving or causing to use, abuse or misuse their knowledge”.

There are a growing number of examples of successful climate resilience projects where solutions have been co-created and are being jointly implemented by management bodies and indigenous and local communities. In the World Heritage site of Kakadu National Park in Australia’s Northern Territory, Aboriginal co-researchers and indigenous rangers work with the national science agency CSIRO, the park management board and other partners for improve decision-making for the management of important species on indigenous lands in a changing climate.

In California, efforts are underway with scientists and traditional knowledge holders to understand how indigenous heritage has developed over centuries in the management of oak forests, including sacred groves, as traditional practices of collection and processing of fire and acorns can underpin adaptive fire management strategies and drought resilience. in a rapidly changing climate.

L&D discussions should include intangible heritage

At COP27 and beyond, it is crucial that greater attention be paid to loss and damage (L&D) of intangible cultural heritage. Until now, because it is difficult or efficient to assign an economic value to them, cultural loss and damage has been largely ignored in development and development policy discussions, which have overwhelmingly centered on calls for a direct climate finance provided by wealthier countries such as the United States and Europe which has historically been responsible for most carbon emissions. Climate finance to help low-income countries in the Global South respond to deteriorating climatic conditions is essential. A analysis by the Heinrich Böll Foundation advocated that by 2030, the wealthiest nations should have developed mechanisms to contribute $150 billion to compensate for loss and damage in the Global South. Even this is a drop in the bucket. By 2050, the Böll Foundation analysis estimates that losses and damages due to climate change will reach at least 1,000 to 1,800 billion dollars, and this without placing any value on the massive worldwide degradation of the cultural heritage of all types.

At the very least, we need to create a new climate science research agenda for cultural heritage that centers indigenous and local knowledge and resilience strategies based on traditional practices. We also need to urgently engage in discussions about the potential benefits of valuing intangible heritage to be able to better represent the true costs of loss and damage.

The new IPCC/UNESCO/ICOMOS report has highlighted the potential harm caused, particularly to indigenous peoples and historically marginalized communities, by underestimating climate impacts on cultural heritage and undervaluing non-scientific knowledge systems . It also demonstrates the resilience benefits that could be achieved by restoring balance. COP27 offers a turning point in which rich nations commit to providing adequate funding for L&D, but also in which all countries move towards equal weight and attention to non-economic L&D, including cultural heritage intangible.

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In Babylon, Iraq, centuries-old building techniques heal climate scars https://fyl-unex.com/in-babylon-iraq-centuries-old-building-techniques-heal-climate-scars/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 22:01:25 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/in-babylon-iraq-centuries-old-building-techniques-heal-climate-scars/ LONDON: Forty days and the protests that have rocked Iran since the death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini at the hands of the regime’s notorious morality police show no sign of abating, but experts remain divided on whether whether the movement can achieve real change. Multiple waves of anti-government protests have rocked Iran over the past […]]]>

LONDON: Forty days and the protests that have rocked Iran since the death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini at the hands of the regime’s notorious morality police show no sign of abating, but experts remain divided on whether whether the movement can achieve real change.

Multiple waves of anti-government protests have rocked Iran over the past two decades, from the 1999 Salam newspaper unrest, in which seven students died, to the 2009 Green Movement, which ended after 72 protesters were killed. by the security forces.

Later came the fuel and gas crisis of 2019, which took 200,000 people to the streets and claimed at least 143 lives, according to human rights monitor Amnesty International.

However, the current protests, which followed Amini’s death in police custody for an alleged breach of the country‘s strict hijab rules, represent something of a sea change, with the regime’s usual heavy-handed response falling short. to blunt their momentum.

“In 2009, the majority of protesters came from the middle classes. In 2022, protesters come from the working classes and lower middle classes,” Yassamine Mather, editor of the British academic journal Critique and an expert on Iranian politics, told Arab News.

“This means that we are seeing more people involved in the protests overall and that the protesters are younger and more courageous than in 2009. They do not seem deterred by the attacks by the security forces.

“It can only be compared to the protests of 1979. All of this coincides with unprecedented workers’ strikes and general unrest. It seems that the crackdown, internet restriction, arrests and killing of protesters have failed.

Nationwide protests across Iran this year are the largest in decades. (AFP)

Indeed, as of this writing, what anti-government groups call the “Mahsa Amini revolution” has become the largest, deepest and bloodiest movement the regime has faced since seizing power in of the 1979 revolution.

Demonstrations took place in more than 80 cities across the country, involving both men and women, and people of all ages and ethnicities. The unrest left more than 200 people dead, including school children.

The movement initially focused on Iran’s strict dress requirements for women, before expanding to include calls for greater civil liberties, eventually leading to a concerted demand for the regime’s outright removal of mullahs.

Sanam Vakil, deputy director of Chatham House and senior fellow for the institute’s Middle East and North Africa programme, told Arab News that the latest protests are the “biggest” the regime has faced.

“Despite government repression, the persistence of protests and the myriad of groups expressing grievances – women, students, labor organizations, ethnic groups, youth groups – reveals the extent of discontent in Iran,” Vakil said.

“We haven’t seen these groups merge simultaneously yet, so that decentralized approach is also a distinguishing quality.”

Vakil and Mather see the decentralized approach as a “blessing and a curse” and fear that the lack of a central authority figure will prove even more problematic as the unrest continues.

Iranian demonstrators gather around a burning motorbike during a protest against rising gasoline prices in the central city of Isfahan on November 16, 2019. (AFP/File Photo)

“Lack of coordination and organization can become a serious problem as protests escalate and repression increases,” Mather said. “The lack of an alternative (to the government) is a problem (and) I don’t believe in the idea of ​​a progressive leadership emerging spontaneously from the ranks of the protesters. This has not happened so far.

The advantage of having a figurehead at the head of a movement is that they can provide clear articulation of their goals on behalf of the population at large. By contrast, the current protests look less like a revolution than a wave of public anger, which will eventually die down.

Dania Koleilat Khatib, co-founder of the Center for Cooperation and Peacebuilding Research, said figureheads can strengthen social movements in several important ways.

“They can take you beyond anger,” Khatib told Arab News. However, there is a tendency to “forget that these things take time”, adding that successful anti-government moves usually take “at least two years”.

Agreeing that identifying a leader “takes time”, Vakil said the process has been further disrupted by the Iranian regime’s “efficiency” in imprisoning, exiling and silencing any potential figureheads.

In some ways, the absence of a clearly identified leader can be a strength. In Mather’s view, the decentralized approach makes it much more difficult to limit protests by “reformist” leaders from within the system who may simply want to replace serving officials and relax some unpopular social rules, but ultimately have intent to leave most of the regime and its policies intact.

Nadim Shehadi, an associate fellow at Chatham House and former head of its Middle East and North Africa program, believes adopting a figurehead would be detrimental to the movement.

Iranian demonstrators shout slogans during an August 2009 demonstration against the swearing in of Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad in Tehran. (AFP/file photo)

“I categorically think a figurehead would be a huge mistake that would strengthen the regime,” Shehadi told Arab News. “It would be very easy to shoot anyone, and that makes the regime stronger.

“I said the same thing in 2011 in several meetings with the international community when they were busy trying to form a credible Syrian opposition. It is up to the opposition to prove its viability, strength, legitimacy and leadership.

“A diffuse and widespread opposition that delegitimizes its power is what will weaken the Iranian regime. It’s about keeping the focus on their inability to govern. Put an individual against them and they lose, and the regime will laugh.

Arash Azizi, a New York University historian and author of “The shadow commander: Soleimani, the US and Iran’s global ambitions,” agrees there is no need for a figurehead, but believes that ” organization and leadership” are needed to deal with the “supercentralized” nature of a regime backed by strong security forces and around 15% of the population.

“The movement needs an organization with connecting points of contact,” Azizi told Arab News. “It can emerge from inside Iran, however difficult that may be, but it can also emerge from outside if Iranian leaders abroad can end their bickering and unite.

“These people have excellent internal access to Iran. A united opposition could be on TV every night, but it has yet to seize the opportunity. Hopefully after six weeks they can see that as the problem.

Chatham House’s Shehadi said the lifespan of the protests was somewhat “intangible”, and as much in the hands of the regime as the protesters, noting that Egypt’s Hosni Mubarak lasted 11 days of protests before stepping down, that Libyan Muammar Gaddafi was killed, and Bashar Assad responded by “burning the country down” and remains in office to this day.

This UGC image posted to Twitter, apparently on October 26, 2022, shows an undisclosed woman standing on top of a vehicle as thousands of people march towards Aichi Cemetery in Saqez, the hometown of Mahsa Amini in the western Iranian province of Kurdistan. (AFP)

Khatib of the Center for Peacebuilding and Cooperation Research is more circumspect about Assad’s approach, arguing that he is “living on borrowed time”, but said the ability of Iranian protesters to tolerate increasing levels of brutality will be significant.

Shehadi agrees, saying that protesters will have to be able to “endure many, many deaths”, and that the regime’s only limit to violence stems from the willingness of the international community to allow that to happen. “And we have seen with Syria that the international community can be very tolerant,” he said.

“It really all depends on the stamina of the protesters,” Khatib said. “I don’t see them holding out because this regime has shown itself to be very willing to be incredibly brutal and if it can unite its various factions, I think the protests will fold, but then the regime will be living on borrowed time.”

Despite differences over how protesters might achieve change, all analysts Arab News spoke to agreed that there appear to be cracks in the regime, with Khatib pointing to differences between the Security Guard Corps Islamic Revolution and the Supreme National Security Council.

“I think we are likely to see a struggle between these centers of power, especially with the impending succession of (Ayatollah) Khamenei, who pushed his son Mojtaba to replace him, even though he is deeply hated,” he said. Khatib.

For Azizi, although it is only speculation that Khamenei is behind the push, there are indications that Mojtaba had built up support within the IRGC. “But once Khamenei is gone, maybe the IRGC won’t need his son anymore,” he added.

Azizi, Mather and Vakil also agree that there are divisions within the establishment over how to handle the protests, with hardliners viewing compromise as a weakness determined to double down on the heavy-handed approach, even if it means destroying the country.

“Pragmatic reformists like (Ali) Larijani see compromise on social issues as a way to restore the government’s lost legitimacy,” Vakil added. “But without consensus on how to handle these issues, political stagnation will follow and protests will prevail.”

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The frustrating history of the World Cup for Canada before Qatar — Toronto Sun https://fyl-unex.com/the-frustrating-history-of-the-world-cup-for-canada-before-qatar-toronto-sun/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 20:08:31 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/the-frustrating-history-of-the-world-cup-for-canada-before-qatar-toronto-sun/ Breadcrumb Links Soccer Before qualifying for the 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar, Canada’s men’s national team had only participated in the tournament once Paul Dolan (goalkeeper) and Ian Bridge of Canada prevent Yannick Stopyra of France from reaching the ball during the Group C match of the 1986 FIFA World Cup Final between Canada […]]]>

Before qualifying for the 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar, Canada’s men’s national team had only participated in the tournament once

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The history of Canada’s men’s national soccer team at the FIFA World Cup is neither long nor distinguished.

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Prior to qualifying for the 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar, Canada’s men’s national team had only participated in the tournament once.

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Canada was one of 24 teams to participate in the 1986 FIFA World Cup in Mexico and were eliminated in the first round, losing all three of their group matches and scoring no goals.

After that, it was a frustrating process for Canada to get back to the World Cup. The team was nowhere near qualifying until head coach John Herdman led arguably the most talented Canadian men’s national team to Qatar.

Here’s a look at Canada’s history at the World Cup:

Soccer in Canada dates back to the late 1800s when the Dominion Football Association and the Western Football Association ruled the game in the country, before the formation of the Canadian Soccer Association, now known as Canada Soccer.

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Canada’s first official international match was in 1924 against Australia, but 20 years earlier a team from Galt, Ontario represented the country at the 1904 Olympics, winning gold.

Canada failed to qualify for the first five editions of the FIFA World Cup and failed to qualify for the 1958 tournament in Sweden.

It wasn’t until 1970 that Canada began to regularly participate in World Cup qualifiers.

Canada made it to the final round of Concacaf qualifying for the 1978 tournament in Argentina, but finished fourth in the six-team group, where Mexico were the only team to qualify from outside the region.

Four years later, with two spots available for the region at the 1982 tournament in Spain, Canada could not defeat Cuba in their final qualifying game and narrowly missed out on Honduras and El Salvador.

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In 1986, with Mexico qualifying as hosts, there was only one berth for the region, which had been determined at the Concacaf Championships the previous year.

Canada edged out Guatemala and Haiti in the first group stage to secure a spot in the final three-team group with Honduras and Costa Rica.

Canada tied Costa Rica 1-1 at Varsity Stadium in Canada and held them scoreless in the second leg in San Jose, Costa Rica. They beat Honduras 1-0 on the road, setting up a win-win rematch at King George V Park in St. John’s, Newfoundland.

Teddy Pakos and Igor Vrablic then scored in the 2-1 win in front of more than 13,000 spectators on a cold, rainy day in September to book a place at the World Cup tournament in Mexico.

Canada was placed in a group with defending European champions France, the Soviet Union and Hungary.

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Canada opened the tournament against France, led by legendary captain Michel Platini.

Canada head coach Tony Waiters rolled the dice and started 20-year-old goalkeeper Paul Dolan, who frustrated the French for nearly 80 minutes.

If French striker Jean-Pierre Papin had tied his boots that day, things could have been a lot different for Canada. Papin, however, missed a number of excellent chances before finally beating Dolan with a header in the 79th minute for the 1-0 victory.

Five days later, Canada played Hungary, who were beaten 6-0 in their opening match by the Soviet Union.

The Hungarians were not the team of the mid-50s, which reached the World Cup final in 1954 with Ferenc Puskas and Sandor Kocsis, but they were still too strong for Canada to win 2-0 .

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This time, Tino Lettieri got the start in net for Canada, which saw a player sent off late in the game when substitute Mike Sweeney picked up two yellow cards in the space of 33 minutes.

Canada finished the tournament against the Soviet Union, who tied France 1-1 in their previous match.

Before the tournament, French head coach Henri Michel was asked his opinion on facing Canada and the Soviet Union in the group stage and he joked: “If we played hockey, I would be very worried.

Having already been knocked out of the second round, Canada entered the game against the Soviet Union looking to score a goal. Dale Mitchell came the closest but was unable to convert on a free kick.

The Soviets scored twice in the second half to win the match 2-0 and finish top of the group. Canada would return home satisfied with their performance and hoped to build on it in future tournaments. Little did they know they wouldn’t qualify for another World Cup for 36 years.

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Canada’s qualification process for the 1990 World Cup in Italy proved short. Canada lost a two-game home-and-away series to Guatemala and were eliminated from the competition. Canada lost the first match 1-0 in Guatemala, then won the second 3-2 at Swangard Stadium in Vancouver, but were eliminated on goal difference. It was the shortest World Cup qualifying campaign in Canadian history.

Four years later, Canada would have one of its longest games, as they played 14 games before finally being eliminated in a home-and-away series against Australia in a continental playoff.

Canada won 2-1 at home in front of 27,000 fans at Commonwealth Stadium in Edmonton, then lost 2-1 in Sydney, requiring a penalty shootout.

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Canada lost on penalties and Australia qualified to face Diego Maradona and Argentina in further continental playoffs, which they lost.

For the 1998 World Cup in France, Canada advanced to the final round of Concacaf qualifying but finished last in the six-team group, largely beaten by Mexico, USA and El Salvador.

It turned out to be the last time Canada made it to the final qualifying stage, known as the Hex, until they were able to advance to the final stage. to eight teams last year for Qatar.

Canada was unable to qualify for the final round of Concacaf qualifying for the 2002, 2006, 2010, 2014 and 2018 tournaments.

Email: dvandiest@postmedia.com

On Twitter: @DerekVanDiest

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Canada draw with co-hosts Australia at 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup https://fyl-unex.com/canada-draw-with-co-hosts-australia-at-2023-fifa-womens-world-cup/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 18:56:03 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/canada-draw-with-co-hosts-australia-at-2023-fifa-womens-world-cup/ Breadcrumb Links Sports Soccer Early Saturday morning, Canada was placed in Group B of the tournament in the official Women’s World Cup draw in Auckland, New Zealand.]]>

Early Saturday morning, Canada was placed in Group B of the tournament in the official Women’s World Cup draw in Auckland, New Zealand.

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Canada will face Nigeria, the Republic of Ireland and co-hosts Australia of the 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup this summer.

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Early Saturday morning, Canada was drawn into Group B of the tournament at the official Women’s World Cup draw in Auckland, New Zealand.

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Canada will open the tournament against Nigeria on July 21 at Melbourne Rectangular Stadium. They will then travel to Perth to face the Republic of Ireland on July 26, and conclude the group stage against Australia on July 31 in Melbourne.

“I’m delighted to have a host country and the recent experience against both teams (Australia, Nigeria) is positive,” said Canada head coach Bev Priestman. “I don’t think there aren’t really any easy matches. Even the likes of Ireland, Vera Pauw is a very experienced coach, they recently drew with Sweden and they will be there to prove in their opener that they belong in this World Cup.

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“I’m more excited than anything, especially to have a home nation, I think it’s going to bring an amazing atmosphere.”

The top two finishers advance to the second round of the tournament, which has grown from 24 teams to 32 and is being held in New Zealand and Australia.

As co-hosts, New Zealand and Australia were two of the eight seeds in the draw, along with Spain, England, USA, France, Sweden and Germany.

Canada, the seventh-ranked team in the world according to the latest Coca-Cola FIFA rankings, were in the next group of teams and were selected second in Pot B, putting them in a group with Australia.

Canada beat Australia in two exhibition games in September, winning 1-0 in Brisbane and 2-1 in Sydney. Canada also hosted Nigeria last April in British Columbia, winning 2-0 in Vancouver and tying 2-2 at Langford.

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“I think Nigeria are a very difficult team to play,” Priestman said. “I think you saw that, especially in the second game we played them on the island, although we did some rotations (to the starting lineup). It’s not an easy team to play and from that particular pot (selection group) it was the team you wanted.

“We won’t underestimate them, I think they have athleticism, they seem more organized than they have been in the past and have a really good coach in Randy (Waldrum) so we don’t won’t underestimate them.”

If Canada are able to make it out of their group, they will face the first or second team in Group D, which includes England, Denmark, China and a qualifier to be determined between Senegal, Haiti or Chile.

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In 2019, at the Women’s World Cup in France, Canada managed to qualify out of their group with the Netherlands, but were then eliminated in the second round by Sweden.

Canada got revenge at the Tokyo Olympics by defeating Sweden in the gold medal game.

Heading into the World Cup as Olympic gold medalists, Canada will be favored, at the very least, to exit the group, if not win it, likely avoiding European champions England in the second round.

“I think we have to go that way to dominate this group,” Priestman said. “You look at crossovers, and it’s not given that England win their group, but you want to avoid them in the round of 16, and any team would say that based on their recent success. We have to so get into the mindset that we can and will be top of this group, but it’s never an easy task in a tournament setting, anything can happen.”

Email:dvandiest@postmedia.com

On Twitter: @DerekVanDiest

FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023

group A
New Zealand
Norway
Philippines
Swiss

Group B
Australia
Republic of Ireland
Nigeria
Canada

Group C
Spain
Costa Rica
Zambia
Japan

Group D
England
Group B winners of the playoffs
Denmark
China

Group E
United States
Vietnam
Netherlands
Group A winners of the playoffs

Group F
France
Jamaica
Brazil
Group C winners of the playoffs

Group G
Sweden
South Africa
Italy
Argentina

Group H
Germany
Morocco
Colombia
South Korea

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Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively yet civil discussion forum and encourages all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments can take up to an hour to be moderated before appearing on the site. We ask that you keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications. You will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, if there is an update to a comment thread you follow, or if a user follows you comments. Visit our Community Rules for more information and details on how to adjust your E-mail settings.

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Atresplayer Premium, the producer of “Veneno” and “Cardo”, prepares the docu-series of Marbella https://fyl-unex.com/atresplayer-premium-the-producer-of-veneno-and-cardo-prepares-the-docu-series-of-marbella/ Wed, 19 Oct 2022 18:21:00 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/atresplayer-premium-the-producer-of-veneno-and-cardo-prepares-the-docu-series-of-marbella/ Atresplayer Premium, the pay-TV platform of the media conglom Atresmedia Group, is preparing docuseries “Érase una vez en Marbella” (Once Upon a Time in Marbella). Produced by Atresmedia TV in collaboration with Seville-based Happy Ending (“Pongamos que hablo de…”), the four-episode, 50-minute series will delve into deeply impacting real-life stories that have had the coastal […]]]>

Atresplayer Premium, the pay-TV platform of the media conglom Atresmedia Group, is preparing docuseries “Érase una vez en Marbella” (Once Upon a Time in Marbella).

Produced by Atresmedia TV in collaboration with Seville-based Happy Ending (“Pongamos que hablo de…”), the four-episode, 50-minute series will delve into deeply impacting real-life stories that have had the coastal town of Marbella southern Andalusia in Spain. , as a common element.

The documentary will explain how Marbella has gone in a few years, since the 1950s, from a fishing village in the province of Malaga to one of the most ostentatious leisure centers of the world jet set.

“Once upon a time in Marbella” will describe different events and characters that, in one way or another, were linked to the city of the Costa del Sol and its universe.

Among the stories he will discuss are that of Princess Diana, who was photographed topless by paparazzi; the inauguration of a new nightclub by French businesswoman Olivia Valère, and that of a young German-Spanish nobleman and property developer Alfonso de Hohenlohe, and his dream of building the most important hotel in the world , the Marbella Club.

The project, whose premiere is tentatively scheduled for the second half of 2023, confirms Atresplayer Premium’s objective of becoming a key player in documentary production, once it has consolidated its position as a major Spanish television fiction platform.

In 2022, the pay-TV platform created “Los Borbones: una familia real”, the first documentary series on the Spanish royal family that had a great media impact. He also launched “Pajares y cía”, a journey through recent Spanish history, from the democratic transition to the present day, through humor.

For 2023, Atresplayer Premium plans to release a true crime series “No se lo digas a nadie”, formerly known as “Besos Marvin”, about the murder of an entire Brazilian family in the municipality of Pioz in Guadalajara, committed in 2016 by a young man.

Other non-fiction formats broadcast by Atresplayer include “Salvados” and “Lo de Évole”, broadcast on the free channel Atresmedia La Sexta.

Expanding rapidly since its launch in 2019, the burgeoning OTT service has established itself as the platform that tilts most Spanish TV drama, with around 20 domestic titles a year comprising both originals – series only seen on the platform in Spain – and titles from the Atresmedia broadcast network. It currently has around 45 series in various stages of production or development.

In recent years, it is the platform that has released outstanding TV series such as HBO Max hit “Veneno” and “Cardo”, sold to TelevisaUnivision’s ViX, two series produced by Buendía Estudios in team with Los Javis de Suma Thrilled.

Other hit titles from Atresplayer Premium include “Alba”, a Boomerang TV adaptation of the Turkish hit “Fatmagul”, “La cocinera de Castamar”, acquired by Netflix, and Paco Cabezas’ crime thriller “La novia gitana”, produced with VIS and Banijay Diagonal Television.

In November, the platform will premiere “La Ruta”, a Caballo Films production, and plans to launch other television fiction series soon such as “Los Protegidos: adn”, “UPA Next”, “Las Noches de Tefía”, “Déjate ver”, “Zorras”, “Red flags” and “Camilo Superstar”.

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