Spain Culture – FYL UNEX http://fyl-unex.com/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 02:08:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://fyl-unex.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Spain Culture – FYL UNEX http://fyl-unex.com/ 32 32 10 tourist destinations for post-pandemic life https://fyl-unex.com/10-tourist-destinations-for-post-pandemic-life/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 02:08:43 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/10-tourist-destinations-for-post-pandemic-life/ 10 travel destinations for post-pandemic life On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization officially classified the COVID-19 outbreak as a pandemic. The resulting travel bans decimated the tourism industry and international air travel initially plummeted as 98%. Almost two years later, travel is finally back on the table, although there are plenty of restrictions […]]]>

10 travel destinations for post-pandemic life

On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization officially classified the COVID-19 outbreak as a pandemic. The resulting travel bans decimated the tourism industry and international air travel initially plummeted as 98%.

Almost two years later, travel is finally back on the table, although there are plenty of restrictions to consider. Anyway, an investigation in September 2021 found that as things returned to normal, 82% of Americans look forward to international travel more than anything else.

To inspire you for your next vacation (whatever it may be), this infographic lists the 10 most visited countries in 2019, along with three of their top attractions according to Google Maps.

have a nice trip

Here are the 10 most popular travel destinations in 2019, measured by their number of international arrivals.

Country Number of international arrivals in 2019 (millions)
🇬🇧France* 90.0
🇪🇸 Spain 83.5
🇺🇸 US 79.3
🇨🇳 China 65.7
🇮🇹 Italy 64.5
🇹🇷 Turkey 51.2
🇲🇽 Mexico 45.0
🇹🇭 Thailand 39.8
🇩🇪 Germany 39.6
🇬🇧 United Kingdom 39.4

*Estimate | Source: World Bank

France was the most popular travel destination by a significant margin, and it’s easy to see why. The country is home to many of the world’s most renowned sites, including the Triumphal arch and Louvre Museum.

The Arc de Triomphe was built in the early 1800s and honors those who died during the French Revolution and Napoleonic Wars. In 1944, Allied soldiers marched through the monument after Paris was liberated from the Nazis.

The Louvre Museum, on the other hand, is often recognized by its giant glass pyramid. The museum houses more than 480,000 works of art, including Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa.

Art isn’t the only thing France has to offer. The country has a reputation for culinary excellence and is home to 632 Michelin-starred restaurants, the most out of any country. Japan comes second, with 413.

While you’re there…

After visiting Paris, you might want to consider a visit to Spain. The country is France’s southern neighbor and is known for its beautiful villages and beaches.

One of its most impressive sites is the Sagrada Familia, a massive 440,000 square foot church that began construction in 1882 and is still being built today (139 years old). The video below shows the striking evolution of the structure.

At a height of 172 meters, the Sagrada Familia is approximately 52 stories tall.

Another popular place is Ibiza, an island off the coast of Spain famous for its vibrant nightlife. The island is frequently mentioned in pop culture – Netflix released an adventure/romance film titled Ibiza in 2018, and the remix of the song by Mike Posner I took a pill in Ibiza has over 1.4 billion views on YouTube.

Beaches galore

If you’re looking for something outside of Europe, consider Mexico or Thailand, which are the 7th and 8th most popular travel destinations. Both offer warm weather and an abundance of white sand beaches.

If you need even more convictions, check out these links:

Expect turbulence

Under normal circumstances, hundreds of billions of dollars are spent by international tourists every year. According to the World Travel & Tourism Council (WTCC), these expenses represented an impressive amount 10.4% of global GDP in 2019.

Travel restrictions introduced in 2020 have dealt a blow to the industry, reducing its share of global GDP to 5.5%, and annihilating an estimate 62 million works. While the WTCC believes those jobs could return by 2022, the emerging Omicron variant has already prompted many countries to tighten restrictions again.

To avoid headaches in the future, make sure you understand the rules and restrictions of where you’re going.

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These 15 Spanish Words Mean Very Different Things Depending On Where You’re From https://fyl-unex.com/these-15-spanish-words-mean-very-different-things-depending-on-where-youre-from/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 02:27:13 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/these-15-spanish-words-mean-very-different-things-depending-on-where-youre-from/ Latinos have tons in common, no matter where they’re from: many of us drink a creamy, eggnog-style drink on the holidays that we can call coquito or rompope, and many of us have memories of dancing in familiar fiestas with nuestros. papás o primos – although the rhythm can vary from bachata to salsa to […]]]>

Latinos have tons in common, no matter where they’re from: many of us drink a creamy, eggnog-style drink on the holidays that we can call coquito or rompope, and many of us have memories of dancing in familiar fiestas with nuestros. papás o primos – although the rhythm can vary from bachata to salsa to merengue.

For the most part, us Hispanohablantes all speak the same language. That being said, some words get extremely lost in translation. If you have ever traveled to another Latin American country, you may have realized that the words you know and love mean very different things in other places. As in, sometimes saying an innocent word like “concha” becomes something attractive embarrassing if you end up in Argentina (at least you’ll laugh about it later!). Ahead, find all the funniest Spanish words that mean different things depending on your country of origin.

1. Ahorite

The word “ahorita” alone is the most debatable word in the Spanish language: does it mean to the nearest second? In a moment? Or later? In some South American countries, “ahorita” emphasizes “ahora” – which means at present. But Puerto Ricans say “ahorita” to mean much later. Meanwhile, in Mexico, that could mean now, in a rato, or maybe never.

2. Bag

Another extremely different word depending on the country you come from, “saco” means “jacket” in several Latin American countries such as Colombia and Panama. However, the same word means “bag” or “bag” almost everywhere else.

3. Pie

This word actually has a triple meaning, and we may never fully understand. Venezuelans and Colombians say the word “torta” means cake, but in Mexico the word actually means a delicious sandwich. Meanwhile, it can also mean a blow or a slap in Argentina.

4. Batata

Okay, this one might be a little weird for anyone not from the Caribbean. While many Latin American countries call sweet potatoes “batatas”, Puerto Ricans and Dominicans are a world apart. To them, “batatas” are calves – like your lower leg.

5. Check

Formally, the word “coger” means “to take” and is used that way in several Hispanic countries like Ecuador, Colombia, Panama, Peru and Cuba. In these places it is totally normal to say “coger algo” to “take something”. That being said, the word means “to have sex” in Argentina, Mexico, Guatemala, Venezuela, and other countries… so beware of the context.

6. Platano

Another word that makes us very confused is “platano”. In Caribbean countries like Puerto Rico, Cuba, and the Dominican Republic, “plátanos” refer to plantains. Meanwhile, they call the bananas “guineos”, and that’s it. However, Mexicans call bananas “plátanos”, and a plantain is actually a “macho plátano”.

7. Conch

Another one that will always make us laugh thinking about it, the word “concha” means roughly 5,000 different things depending on where you’re from. First, we have Mexican conchas, or delicious sweet breads that go very well with chocolate caliente. Other countries like Venezuela or Colombia say “concha” to mean a seashell, while places like Argentina and Uruguay say the word to refer to the female anatomy. The more you know!

8. Pastels

The word “pastel” seems to have a different meaning in every country, which makes it quite confusing if we say it ourselves. “Pastel” means cake in Mexico, but refers to a tamale-like holiday dish made with plantains or yuca in Puerto Rico. Meanwhile, Cubans have “pastelitos,” or pastries.

9. Vaina

Ah, the classic word to end all the words of the Spanish language: “vaina”. As some Hispanics know, “vaina” can stand in for just about any word in our vocabulary – it could be that bowl of cereal, that houseplant, or that argument. “Vaina” means “thing” for Colombians, Dominicans, Venezuelans and other nationalities, but in other places? It simply means a pod or husk.

10. Galleta

The Spanish word “galleta” has several different meanings – and saying it in different countries might make some people scratch their heads. The classic definition of “galleta” is cookie, and most Latin American countries use it that way. However, Dominicans and Puerto Ricans also say “galleta” to refer to a slap, while Mexicans sometimes use the idiom “echarle galleta” which means to work hard for something.

11. Rato

Ah, just like “ahorita”, the word “rato” is another tricky word whose meaning we will never fully know. Officially, “rato” means “some time”, but how long this period is depends on where you are from and the situation. In most countries “one rato” is long, but in Mexico it can also mean a few minutes.

12. Check mark

Depending on where you’re from, “tick” can mean three very different things. Some Latin American countries like Mexico and Uruguay use it to refer to a car, but Guatemalans use “checkmark” to refer to a pig. Meanwhile, Cubans and Puerto Ricans say “checkmark” to refer to a stroller. OK so !

13. Mona or mono

If someone calls you “mona” or “mono”, don’t worry too much – they don’t necessarily call you a monkey. People in countries like Spain and Puerto Rico use the word to describe something pretty or cute, so it’s actually a (kinda weird) compliment.

14. Guagua

We’re not quite over this one yet: depending on where you’re from, “guagua” can mean something very specific – or nothing at all. This hilarious word actually means “baby” or “child” in places like Chile, but in Cuba? It actually means a bus. Meanwhile, in other countries, “guagua” may seem made up.

15. Bollo

Last but not least, we have the word “bollo”, which can either sound like something completely normal or make you laugh a little – it all depends on where you’re from. In Colombia, bollos are buns or rolls usually made of corn, in Mexico they refer to a kind of bread, and Panamanian bollos de maíz are similar to tamales. However, in Cuba it actually means the lower regions of a woman – so there is this fun fact of the day.

Do you notice the necessary corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

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Dorms appear in Spain as more students seek accommodation away from home https://fyl-unex.com/dorms-appear-in-spain-as-more-students-seek-accommodation-away-from-home/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 14:00:09 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/dorms-appear-in-spain-as-more-students-seek-accommodation-away-from-home/ MÁLAGA, Spain – While learning to develop video games, 21-year-old David León Serrano had an experience quite unprecedented for a Spaniard: living in student accommodation on the south coast of Spain, a five-hour drive from his family home in Madrid. Studying away from home is a familiar experience in many parts of the world, but […]]]>

MÁLAGA, Spain – While learning to develop video games, 21-year-old David León Serrano had an experience quite unprecedented for a Spaniard: living in student accommodation on the south coast of Spain, a five-hour drive from his family home in Madrid.

Studying away from home is a familiar experience in many parts of the world, but a relatively new phenomenon in southern Europe. In Spain, for example, only around 17% of students do their higher education outside their home region, according to the Spanish government. In the United States, by comparison, residents make up less than 20 percent of the student body in most states.

“I think young people are now starting to understand that if we move at least in our own country, it is good for our development,” said Mr. León Serrano, “not only in terms of finding the best place to study what we want, but also in terms of independence and becoming a more complete person.

Her studio, which includes a kitchenette and a bathroom, costs 700 euros (almost $ 800) per month, paid for by her parents. The Málaga Residence is one of 13 student housing units managed by Livensa Living, which is partly owned by Brookfield Asset Management in Toronto.

The growing mobility of the Spanish student population is fueling an increase in investment in student dormitories, which are largely financed by foreign capital. Investors are also following Spain’s growing appeal to foreign students wishing to study there.

Spain’s sunshine and outdoor lifestyle have helped make it the first choice for students participating in Erasmus +, the European Union’s academic exchange program. Spain has also started to attract more and more Latin American students, especially those whose first language is Spanish, and it is a popular choice for participants of study abroad programs. in the USA.

Campus life has been on the back burner for much of 2020 by the pandemic, but students have returned in large numbers, especially keen to enjoy the community lifestyle they lacked when much of the world was out. blocked. Real estate investors have followed suit.

In Malaga, for example, the number of student accommodation beds has increased by almost 50% over the past year, according to a study released in September by JLL, a real estate services company. Highlighting the rebound, new investments in the sector reached 140 million euros in the first half of 2021, up 140% from the previous year.

Real estate investors are entering a Spanish student housing market which they believe was not only underperforming, but also in dire need of an overhaul.

Catholic religious orders have long dominated the student dormitory market in Spain, and they still provide about half of its beds. But these Catholic residences rarely have the gymnasiums, movie theaters, and other facilities that today’s generation of students expects, and many also enforce conservative rules, especially to ensure that male and female students live separately. And at a time when the Spanish Catholic Church struggles to attract its own new generation of nuns and priests, it also faces a shortage of staff in its residences.

“Over the next decade I think all religious orders are in danger of being understaffed,” said lvaro Soto de Scals, managing director of Grupo Moraval, a Spanish developer specializing in the construction of student accommodation, especially for Livensa. In May, Moraval formed a joint venture with EQT Exeter of Sweden to invest 500 million euros in student accommodation in Spain.

On the other hand, “student mobility is increasing, as is the appetite for better education,” said Soto de Scals.

One of the reasons for lower student mobility in Spain is “a very strong parenting culture, especially compared to my experience in the UK where you pretty much expect to find your own accommodation once that you will be 18, ”Amber Banks-Smith said. , the British deputy director of the Livensa student residence in Malaga. In fact, parents pay the rent and handle other administrative matters on behalf of most resident students, she said.

Spanish lawmakers are also making it easier for developers to obtain building permits for dormitories, not only to help students but also to free up housing for other residents in their crowded cities. Moving students out of city centers “is one way to relieve some of the pressure in the residential market,” said Soto de Scals.

Ashraf Bachiri, a Moroccan student, moved to Livensa’s new premises in Malaga last year, after sharing an apartment with two other students in downtown Malaga. The cost of his Livensa studio is double what his father paid for the shared downtown apartment, but “my dad also felt it was safer for me to have my own space and live. in a well-managed place, ”Bachiri said. Livensa offers 24-hour surveillance around its enclosure, which is equipped with security cameras.

Spain has around 1.6 million students at its universities. There are about 100,000 beds in student dormitories, a shortage of about 450,000 beds needed, according to the JLL study. Even if the pace of housing construction accelerates, the gap is expected to widen over the next decade as the number of students in need of housing is expected to grow even faster.

“Spain has a very strong pipeline for the next two years, but we still believe there is room for more,” said Juan Manuel Pardo, a Spanish executive at JLL. Although foreign students also contribute to growth, he said, “what drives demand the most is the increased mobility of students in Spain”.

Besides Brookfield Asset Management, several other foreign investors have entered Spain. Spain’s largest student housing operator, Resa, was acquired by Axa, the French insurance company, and CBRE Investment Management in New York in 2017. Student Experience, a Dutch company funded by Rinkelberg Capital, announced five projects in Spain totaling around 5,000 beds. , including one in Pozuelo de Alarcón, near Madrid, which local authorities approved in May.

Xior, a Belgian company, started investing in student accommodation in Barcelona and Madrid in 2019, and now owns 15% of its portfolio in Spain. It is mostly building from scratch, but in September Xior won a contract to convert a former army barracks into student accommodation in central Zaragoza, a Spanish city that has long been a training ground for the army of the country.

Xior focused on Spain, as well as neighboring Portugal, as he found that “the existing supply was really limited and outdated,” said Christian Teunissen, managing director of the company. Both countries are now experiencing “a big change in supply,” fueled by the demand for student dormitories that are safer and better equipped than older apartments in the city.

As a student, Mr. Teunissen recalls, “we just wanted to have fun” in a student building, without worrying about issues like fire safety infrastructure. But he added that today’s students “want to check in in a real apartment, they want more luxury, and even shared bathrooms are no longer acceptable.”

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Horned helmets predate the Vikings by 3,000 years, originating in the Bronze Age, researchers say https://fyl-unex.com/horned-helmets-predate-the-vikings-by-3000-years-originating-in-the-bronze-age-researchers-say/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 17:48:19 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/horned-helmets-predate-the-vikings-by-3000-years-originating-in-the-bronze-age-researchers-say/ By Sana Noor Haq, CNN From appearing in the Asterix comic book series to the inspiration of an avatar on “The Masked Singer,” Vikings have revealed themselves through pop culture with horned helmets to symbolize their ferocity and power. However, two horned helmets first discovered in Viksø, Denmark, date back to Sardinia in the Bronze […]]]>

By Sana Noor Haq, CNN

From appearing in the Asterix comic book series to the inspiration of an avatar on “The Masked Singer,” Vikings have revealed themselves through pop culture with horned helmets to symbolize their ferocity and power.

However, two horned helmets first discovered in Viksø, Denmark, date back to Sardinia in the Bronze Age – dispelling myths that they originated from the Viking Age, according to research published in the historical journal Praehistorische Zeitschrift in December.

“For many years in popular culture, people associated Viksø helmets with Vikings,” said Helle Vandkilde, an archaeologist at Aarhus University in Denmark who participated in the research, in a press release sent to CNN.

“But our research confirms that the helmets were deposited in the bog around 900 BC, nearly 3,000 years ago and several centuries before the Vikings or Scandinavians dominated the area.”

Similar images of horned helmets were identified during the Bronze Age in Sardinia, the southwest of the Iberian Peninsula and southern Scandinavia, according to the study.

During the Bronze Age in Sardinia, symbols of horned creatures such as bulls had religious significance and were often used to decorate Neolithic tombs.

The motif of the horned helmet is linked to the Iberian Peninsula through the expansion of Phoenician society to the west, research suggests. The Phoenicians were a group of people who inhabited the Levantine coast in the eastern Mediterranean, according to the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

The Phoenician sea routes coincide with the addition of Scandinavia to the network, exposing a Mediterranean-Atlantic sea route in the Baltic Sea. The helmets would not have been transported by land, as “the otherwise flourishing transalpine trade route appears to have been inactive in disseminating the image of the horned warrior hero,” the researchers said.

“Our study shows that Scandinavian depictions of horned warriors occur at the same time as very similar images in Sardinia and southwestern Spain. This testifies to the close links between the great civilizations of Bronze Age Europe; the first globalization based on long-distance trade in metals, ideas and luxury goods, ”added Vandkilde.

“The horned warriors in Scandinavia, Sardinia and Spain are all associating with new political regimes supported by metal control and new religious beliefs.”

Those who wore horned helmets would have been considered “the quintessential warrior,” the researchers said.

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Black Indian masman Narrie Approo dies at 94 https://fyl-unex.com/black-indian-masman-narrie-approo-dies-at-94/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 22:43:02 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/black-indian-masman-narrie-approo-dies-at-94/ News Janelle De Souza 4 hours ago Narrie Approo, veteran of the traditional mas, is one of the black Indian masks. Approo died Thursday at the age of 94. Photo courtesy of Maria Nunes – Black Indians mainstay Narrie Approo passed away, following the death of jazz kaiso pioneer Clive “Zanda” Alexander on Thursday. Approo, […]]]>

News



Narrie Approo, veteran of the traditional mas, is one of the black Indian masks. Approo died Thursday at the age of 94. Photo courtesy of Maria Nunes –

Black Indians mainstay Narrie Approo passed away, following the death of jazz kaiso pioneer Clive “Zanda” Alexander on Thursday.

Approo, 94, the founder of mas group Last of the Black Tribe, died around 11 p.m. in a retirement home.

He received the Hummingbird’s Silver Medal for Culture and Community Service in 2018.

He was born in Harmony Hall, San Fernando, but his family moved to John John, east of Port of Spain when he was five.

Anderson Patrick, leader of the Warriors of Huracan group, explained that the Black Indian is not just a group but a 175-year tradition based on family and community. With each new leader, the group is renamed, and so Last of the Black Tribe became Warriors of Huracan when Approo passed the title of Okenaga (King) to Patrick in 2011.

“Black Indians are First Peoples, so we have a whole tradition and a culture. So Narrie and my father, who was also a masman, were responsible for my involvement.

Patrick said that in addition to being the leader of the Black Indians, Approo worked with the Port Authority and was a barber and boxer by training. He also fashioned masks for others, built wings, and made complete costumes for the bat and devil characters.

Masman Narrie Approo in a portrait of a Black Indian. Photo courtesy of Maria Nunes –

He said that Approo loved Dobermans and German Shepherds and was a “birdman” who trained and cared for many types of birds.

He was patient, but also a perfectionist. If he made a costume and the measurements weren’t exact, if he couldn’t fix it, he would throw it away and start from scratch. He was also strict about punctuality. “

Curator, visual artist and former mask designer Kathryn Chan said her friend Approo was a committed masman who made and performed her own costumes and taught others to do the same. He has played many traditional farmhouse characters including a sailor, devils and imps, a midnight thief and a black Indian as well as movie characters.

“He was a masman who perfected his craft. He used materials from his surroundings and turned them into pearls and sequins and made the most incredible most detailed costumes. And he would write his own speeches. He also loved opera.

She said that in February 2021 there was a ceremony at UWI because she, librarian Lorraine Nero and others turned over the first part of the Approo archive to be part of the West Indiana collections and specials from Alma Jordan Library, UWI. She also compiles a bibliography of everything that has ever been written about him, of every song or recording ever made of him.

A statement from the National Carnival Commission described Approo as a talented masquerade, cultural representative and gifted pan player.

“For many decades, Mr. Approo, a true son of the land, has set one of the highest standards for consistency and commitment to mas. Beginning his trip to the farmhouse at the age of five, he would continue to preserve and promote the “Black Indian” farmhouse after being inducted into the warrior of Huaracan at the age of 11. It’s no secret that the Black Indian Farmhouse is where it is today for the most part, and thanks, Mr. Approo.

He sent condolences to his family and friends, adding that his death was a significant loss to the TT cultural community.

“The NCC will continue to celebrate and remember these titans for their invaluable contributions who have helped shape and define our culture and, in so doing, preserve their legacy for the future. “

Also offering his condolences in a press release, Tourism, Culture and the Arts Minister Randall Mitchell said: “Another icon has passed away, but his legacy will live on. Narrie Approo will be remembered for his skill in bending threads and beading and for his ability to make elaborate costumes that delighted spectators during the carnival. This type of art and flair will certainly be missed.


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Alaba culture shock: I went to dinner at 8:00 p.m. and there was no one there https://fyl-unex.com/alaba-culture-shock-i-went-to-dinner-at-800-p-m-and-there-was-no-one-there/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 10:45:55 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/alaba-culture-shock-i-went-to-dinner-at-800-p-m-and-there-was-no-one-there/ Ssince joining the club in summer, David Alaba quickly became an essential cog in the real Madrid machine. His rapid adaptation to Spanish football has greatly contributed to real Madridcurrent league leading position in LaLiga Santander and there is no sign of slowing down. But life off the pitch was an even more difficult change, […]]]>

Ssince joining the club in summer, David Alaba quickly became an essential cog in the real Madrid machine. His rapid adaptation to Spanish football has greatly contributed to real Madridcurrent league leading position in LaLiga Santander and there is no sign of slowing down.

But life off the pitch was an even more difficult change, having left the German champions Bayern Munich on a free transfer.

“The schedule here is quite different and it has been a big change for me”, Alaba said in an interview with the German publication SZ.

“Especially in summer, life comes to a complete stop in the afternoon.

“When I was here early and wanted to have dinner, I would arrive at the restaurant at 8:00 PM and often sit alone. When I left, the first customers would arrive.”

This is often one of the biggest cultural shocks foreign gamers experience when they first settle in Spain, with most Europeans choosing to eat much earlier in the evening.

Another stumbling block for some new players is learning a completely different language in the chaos of knowing new players, the team and the style of football.

“This is extremely important and I still remember my time at Bayern the importance attached to integration into this type of club “, Alaba said, discussing how language barriers are handled within football clubs.

“The Bayern the physiotherapists have always encouraged me to speak with foreign players in German so that they can integrate as quickly as possible “

Carlo Ancelotti speaks perfect Spanish. But, everyone in Munich understood that too. Everyone spoke excellent English.

“He is a top notch person and brings an amazing experience. He loves his job and tries to continue to develop us as players so that we always play at the highest level. What impressed me the most, c ‘s how hungry he is to succeed. “

The Austrian praised his new club and his winning mentality, saying it has contributed immensely to his decision to join the Spanish giants.

real Madrid represent success in general “, Alaba noted.

“You notice it in the day-to-day work with the team and all the employees.

real Madrid are among the clubs that invest everything to be on top and this is especially seen in the Champions League. I believe that the attitude of real Madrid towards this competition will never change. “


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C. Tangana embraces tradition on his revolutionary album, “El Madrileño” https://fyl-unex.com/c-tangana-embraces-tradition-on-his-revolutionary-album-el-madrileno/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:03:51 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/c-tangana-embraces-tradition-on-his-revolutionary-album-el-madrileno/ “El Madrileño” – the man from Madrid. This is the easiest way to describe Antón Álvarez Alfaro, who plays the role of C. Tangana. But it’s also the title of his 2021 album – an ambitious musical journey through generations, genres and lyrical traditions that earned him a 2022 Grammy nomination for best Latin or […]]]>

“El Madrileño” – the man from Madrid.

This is the easiest way to describe Antón Álvarez Alfaro, who plays the role of C. Tangana.

But it’s also the title of his 2021 album – an ambitious musical journey through generations, genres and lyrical traditions that earned him a 2022 Grammy nomination for best Latin or alternative rock album.

There are notes of tango, urbano, rock, Spanish copla – and they are all brought together perfectly by Tangana’s modern approach to the rich musical heritage that shaped her worldview.

He spoke to NPR’s Eyder Peralta about the possibility of doing a 180 from rap to folklore, working with flamenco maestros and decolonizing the cultural mindset from Spain to Latin America.

The following has been condensed for clarity and length.


Interview highlights

Go from Spanish trap to folk music

Well, I’ve listened to this music all my life, but never tried it in the studio. So I was 28 or 29, something like that. And I started to feel like the [other] music was not enough for me, that my ambitions were greater at the time. So I just started making the music that I was listening to [to] all my life. “El Madrileño” is the result.

Working with Gipsy Kings and pushing the limits of flamenco

I am a huge fan of Gipsy Kings. I still play them in every party I have. They are like legends, but they are also somewhat criticized by flamenco purists here in Spain. So for me it’s like a statement to do a collaboration with them because I’m not a purist, and it’s an album that is about not being a purist and being mixed up and trying to bring out the culture of borders. It was like, “OK, what do you want for this song?” And my dream was to have them, so it’s crazy for me.

On her songwriting process

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No soy muy técnico, I did not study music. But I have this kind of feeling about popular music. In Spain we do not understand popular as “pop”. Pop music is like the mainstream. But here in Spain, when we say popular, we speak of tradition. Talk about the feelings everyone has, or something you have about your grandfather. This is the popular thing. Something that a grandfather and su nieto can relate to. So when I write a song, it’s usually easy. It is not pretentious. It’s always trying to get to the heart of the simple things and most people can figure it out.

On the sound layers of his song “Muriendo de Envidia” with Cuban guitarist Eliade Ochoa

We start with a classic rumba sound called “Lola”. This is a son that El Pescaílla used to sing to Lola Flores, who is one of the biggest names in Spanish music. So we start there, but we have the particular color of the Eliades [Ochoa] guitar, which is a mix between a classical guitar and very Cubano. It is a mix that he only has this instrument. He did it and it is the instrument he plays. And then the sound continued con a cubano sound with a mambo. You know, the origin of salsa is in Cuba. So it’s a bit of a mixture of the traditional way of playing son and the modern way, or the Fania way, the 70s way of Nuyorican salsa.

On what he describes as Spain’s “colonial state of mind” towards Latin American music

I think it’s something about an older generation. They thought that Spain was culturally the main one, and the other countries were trying to reach the level of Spain. And that’s something my generation – we don’t feel good about it, and we don’t think it’s real because we grew up listening to Latin music and having all these superstars. No se, sentíamos que eran mucho más grandes que los Españoles. And the people here only looked at themselves, estaban equivocados.

They were wrong because the estrellas creian that here in Spain were bigger, and they weren’t. And we were listening [Latin] music. And also with reggaeton, the explosion of reggaeton – it was super clear that the culture with our language estaba dominada por el Caribe Fundamentalmente, pero en general por América Latina. So I think with this album, a lot of people – old people here from Spain – ha dado un paso hacia esa música y ese reconocimiento.

If he was worried about cultural appropriation by attacking Latin genres for this album

I think this is a subject of nuestra generación. It’s something everyone has in mind. But I really have the impression that el Mediterraneo – you know España, Marruecos, Turkia, Grecia e Italia – it’s not the same here as in the United States, you know? For us, being mixed is the natural thing. We don’t understand culture, we don’t understand progress, and we don’t understand society without mixing. So my approach is only trying to reflect that. Lo mismo que con los maestros. If you want to reach a level, you have to go to that level and work with the people at that level. So it’s the same with culture. If you want to understand bachata, you have to go to the Dominican Republic and dance there in a small bodega.

On his Small office performance, which became the most circulated Tiny Desk in 2021

The first time we performed live during the pandemic was at the Tiny Desk concert – the first time we were together. We had [take] a lot of testing, after being without anyone for months. And then we just stayed together for one day. And it’s a real celebration. We ate and drank, and really enjoyed ourselves there for the first time in a long time. We felt it. It’s a very special piece for me. I think it’s something very meaningful for the Spaniards because it represents our way of experiencing music, and I’m super proud and also super grateful to be able to do that.


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Explore the symbolism behind Picasso’s painting “Guernica” https://fyl-unex.com/explore-the-symbolism-behind-picassos-painting-guernica/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 20:07:18 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/explore-the-symbolism-behind-picassos-painting-guernica/ As one of the most famous artists in the history of Western art, Pablo Picasso is known for his remarkably prolific career which spanned 79 years and included multiple disciplines. In particular, his paintings have undergone several stylistic evolutions such as cubism and surrealism, reflecting the artist’s permanent need to push the limits. And while […]]]>

As one of the most famous artists in the history of Western art, Pablo Picasso is known for his remarkably prolific career which spanned 79 years and included multiple disciplines. In particular, his paintings have undergone several stylistic evolutions such as cubism and surrealism, reflecting the artist’s permanent need to push the limits. And while many of Picasso’s paintings are known for their pioneering appearances, only one is known for its powerful anti-war message: the 1937 painting, Guernica.

Measuring approximately 11 feet tall and 25 feet wide, this massive piece of work is visually striking in its scale, composition, and unusual grayscale palette. Its dark subject was fueled by the Nazi bombing of the Basque town of Guernica in northern Spain during the Spanish Civil War. The work was then used by the Spanish government to help raise awareness about the war and raise the necessary funds.

Here we will learn more about the historical context in which Guernica was made before analyzing the anti-war symbolism within the painting.

Who was Picasso?

Photo by Pablo Picasso

Photograph by Pablo Picasso, 1962 (Photo: Public domain via Wikimedia Commons)

Picasso (1881 – 1973) was a Spanish child prodigy who began his creative career at the age of thirteen. As he continued to make art, his realistic and academic approach to painting waned, while other, more imaginative styles became increasingly important. His work can be traced through eight different periods: realist, blue period, pink period, African, cubism, surrealism, neoclassicism, and later works. Picasso used each of these distinct approaches to explore aesthetics, figurative subjects, emotions, and reality. He is considered one of the most influential figures in modern art.

Commissioning Guernica and its historical context

Ruins of Guernica

Photograph of the ruins of Guernica, 1937 (Photo via Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA 3.0 de)

In 1937, Picasso, who lived and worked in France, was commissioned by the Spanish republican government to create a work of art for the Spanish pavilion at the upcoming Universal Exhibition in Paris.

Meanwhile, Spain was in the midst of a civil war between Republicans and Nationalists. The Basque town of Guernica was one of the bases of the republican movement, as well as a center of Basque culture. For this reason, the city was targeted by nationalists assisted by the Nazis and bombed on April 26, 1937, for two hours.

dora-maar-picasso-working-on-guernica-1937-a

Shortly after the tragedy, Picasso was encouraged by a close friend to make the attack the purpose of the commission. Picasso immersed himself in reports of the atrocities and, horrified by the state of his home country, began working on a large-scale painting based on the event.

The piece was completed in just 35 days.

Analyse of Guernica

Guernica - Picasso

Composition

Since the commission was originally intended to be a mural for the World’s Fair, Guernica was designed as a very large canvas (approximately 11 feet by 25 feet). Picasso opted for a matte house paint so the room had little to no gloss, and he chose a limited palette of black, gray, and white to mimic the effect of black and white photography.

Guernica represents the after the bombardment in a contained space. From left to right: a distraught mother mourns her dead child; a bull rises above his shoulder with a blank or shocked expression; wounded horse screams in pain as dead soldier is trapped under his body; two women watch the scene in amazement; and another woman is trapped in a fire and screams.

Style

Guernica (Picasso)

As part of Picasso’s later work, Guernica exhibits qualities from different stylistic periods, but more particularly, cubist and surrealist characteristics. The range of different human and animal subjects is spread across the entire canvas, their shapes distorted into dreamlike versions of themselves. Most the numbers overlap, creating more shapes and narratives in these additional spaces.

Symbolism

Picasso, Pablo (1881-1973) - 1937 Guernica (Prado, Madrid)

While the anti-war message of Guernica is clear, the specifics of the painting’s symbolism are still debated among art historians. The bull and the horse, for example, are both important subjects in Picasso’s work, but have also been theorized as important figures who perhaps embody people or ideals.

Others have pointed out that using grayscale gives the impression of desolation and torment and the crowded and chaotic composition means oppression. Likewise, the torsion shapes of bodies have been interpreted as a expression in the face of adversity, fire is seen as the destructive power of war, and the dismembered arm holding the broken sword is representative of the people defeat.

Picasso said of the symbolism of the painting: “It is not for the painter to define the symbols. Otherwise, it would be better if he wrote them in so many words! The audience viewing the image should interpret the symbols as they understand them.

Legacy of Guernica

led mural

After Guernica, it was used during the World’s Fair to raise awareness of the Spanish Civil War. The painting was later sent to the United States to help raise funds for the Spanish refugees. Picasso said that Guernica was not to be returned to Spain until she had reestablished a republic. Finally, in 1981, the monumental piece was transferred to its country of origin.

Today it can be seen at the Reina Sofía Museum in Madrid.

Related Articles:

10 surprising facts about Pablo Picasso

The evolution of Picasso’s painting style and what each artistic choice represents

9 facts about Picasso’s revolutionary painting ‘Les Demoiselles d’Avignon’


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Rizal Day: opening of a center promoting the heroism of José Rizal in New York https://fyl-unex.com/rizal-day-opening-of-a-center-promoting-the-heroism-of-jose-rizal-in-new-york/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 05:02:00 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/rizal-day-opening-of-a-center-promoting-the-heroism-of-jose-rizal-in-new-york/ Deni Rose M. Afinidad-Bernardo – Philstar.com December 30, 2021 | 1:02 p.m. MANILA, Philippines – To mark the 125th anniversary of the death of Dr Jose Rizal, the National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA), chaired by President Arsenio “Nick” J. Lizaso, in partnership with the Consulate General of the Philippines (PCG) in New […]]]>
Deni Rose M. Afinidad-Bernardo – Philstar.com

December 30, 2021 | 1:02 p.m.

MANILA, Philippines – To mark the 125th anniversary of the death of Dr Jose Rizal, the National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA), chaired by President Arsenio “Nick” J. Lizaso, in partnership with the Consulate General of the Philippines (PCG) in New York, led by Consul General Elmer Cato, is scheduled to open the 36th Sentro Rizal (SR) today, Rizal Day, at the Philippine Center, 556 Fifth Avenue, New York City.

Located in one of the cultural capitals of the world, Sentro Rizal (SR) New York is excited to host events to raise awareness of Filipino culture, especially among Filipino-Americans in New York and the Tri-State area. Various offerings such as lectures, performances, exhibitions and film screenings are expected to be implemented by PCG New York’s cultural and public diplomacy team who have successfully put together their own flagship projects for the implementation. network and promote Filipino products and businesses in its area of ​​jurisdiction. With SR New York in place, the Consulate will work closely with the NCCA to further strengthen its commitments to cultural promotion and commemoration of significant events in Philippine and Philippine history.

SR aims to promote Filipino arts, culture and languages ​​across the world. Its mandate is to establish Filipino centers in various countries where there are overseas Filipino children who need to familiarize themselves with their roots, and in countries with large Filipino communities.

The Sentro Rizal serves as a Filipino language learning center, where the NCCA provides materials for language learning; a Philippine Cultural Resource Center, where a library collection in print and electronic media on Filipino culture, tourism and investment is made available; and a Filipino Cultural Center where a wide range of cultural activities take place for interested Filipinos and foreign nationals.

To date, the NCCA has inaugurated 35 Sentro Rizal centers around the world, with Madrid, Spain being the first site established on June 12, 2011, while the most recent is in Honolulu, Hawaii, United States, inaugurated on August 26. .

For more details on this event, please visit the Philippine Consulate General in New York on Facebook or [email protected]

RELATED: Film on the life of José Rizal, works shown around the world for Rizal Day


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Jewelery thieves arrested on Spain’s Costa Blanca https://fyl-unex.com/jewelery-thieves-arrested-on-spains-costa-blanca/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 09:41:24 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/jewelery-thieves-arrested-on-spains-costa-blanca/ Credit, Guardia Civil Jewelery thieves caught on the Spanish Costa Blanca. The young thieves had managed to steal more than one hundred thousand euros of jewelry. Guardia Civil agents arrested two Albanian nationals, aged 20 and 22. The suspects allegedly committed four thefts with use of force in Valencia and Murcia. The suspects had also […]]]>
Credit, Guardia Civil

Jewelery thieves caught on the Spanish Costa Blanca. The young thieves had managed to steal more than one hundred thousand euros of jewelry.

Guardia Civil agents arrested two Albanian nationals, aged 20 and 22. The suspects allegedly committed four thefts with use of force in Valencia and Murcia. The suspects had also tried to flee from the police.

The alleged perpetrators of these crimes have now been remanded in custody by the Torrevieja Magistrates’ Court, which is hearing the case.

December 8, Civil Guard agents from Torrevieja were carrying out an operation in a residential area to prevent crime. They spotted a car approaching them, but when the driver noticed the police, the car sped off. A chase ensued and the car was followed by several patrol vehicles. Officers managed to catch up with the suspects, but the two left the car and attempted to escape on foot before being caught.

The men were quickly caught and the car searched. It was discovered that the men were carrying 500 euros in cash and jewelry was also recovered.

An investigation was opened and officers discovered that the suspects had stolen jewelry from a house in Caravaca de la Cruz, in the region of Murcia. They had also made several flights to Valencia.

The thieves had staked out the houses they intended to break into and were awaiting the departure of the owners. The men then broke into homes and stole jewelry and money.

Agents of the Guardia Civil of Torrevieja were able to recover jewelry worth over 116,000 euros. The alleged perpetrators of the thefts were charged with four offenses of forcible theft and one of serious disobedience and resistance. They were also charged with an offense of having false documents.


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