Spain Culture – FYL UNEX http://fyl-unex.com/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 18:27:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://fyl-unex.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Spain Culture – FYL UNEX http://fyl-unex.com/ 32 32 Portadown Castle bonfire will be ‘something Northern Ireland has never seen before’ https://fyl-unex.com/portadown-castle-bonfire-will-be-something-northern-ireland-has-never-seen-before/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 18:27:34 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/portadown-castle-bonfire-will-be-something-northern-ireland-has-never-seen-before/ The builders of a new castle bonfire in Portadown have revealed what inspired their unique design. Corcrain and Redmanville bonfire builders have come up with a new style of bonfire for July 8, which they believe will provide a safer night for all attendees while giving them something they don’t. have never seen before. Last […]]]>

The builders of a new castle bonfire in Portadown have revealed what inspired their unique design.

Corcrain and Redmanville bonfire builders have come up with a new style of bonfire for July 8, which they believe will provide a safer night for all attendees while giving them something they don’t. have never seen before.

Last year, their bonfire was 280 pallets high, but they felt that building bonfires that high was becoming untenable due to the dangers it could pose to the community.

Read more: Bonfire site on East Belfast Greenway will be ‘clean and tidy’, says councilor

After meetings with local residents and the council, the builders have developed the castle bonfire which they hope will show the positive aspects of their culture and heritage across the world.

They also agreed to light the bonfire on Friday, July 8, as July 10 is a Sunday and the community felt it would be best to hold the celebration a few days earlier.



The Bonfire at Corcrain Castle and Redmanville in Portadown

Speaking to Belfast Live, Andre Austin said: “Last year we had a huge bonfire 280 pallets high and it was starting to worry the local community because of the dangers it could pose to people. , especially with the added risk of collapse.

“We felt that reducing the height of the structure was the best thing we could do and instead of trying to build the tallest bonfire in Northern Ireland and competing with Ballycraigy and Craigyhill, we decided to do something completely different and build a bonfire that no one has ever seen before.

“The idea for the castle bonfire came from our celebrations last year called Disney Land of Ulster, and we thought if people were going to say that, we should give them a castle.

“Over the past few years we have done a lot to get rid of the negative things that can be associated with bonfires and seek to promote all that is positive about our heritage and culture.”



The Bonfire at Corcrain Castle and Redmanville in Portadown

Andre said bonfire builders have been gathering for the bonfire since last winter and there has been a real community effort to put it all together.

He said: “There are 10 adults who oversee the bonfire every year and the others who help are young people and teenagers, so everyone can get involved.

“Over the past year we have all been collecting pallets and everything prepped and ready with the first pallets on site the second week of April.

“We don’t have the manpower that some other bonfires will have, but I doubt there’s anywhere that’s built anything like ours this year.”

Read more: A public consultation will be held on the future of the dividing bonfire site at Belfast’s North Interface

Read more: Belfast council risks legal liability for bonfires on its land, internal report warns

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18th century Spanish shipwreck has $17 billion worth of coins and gems on board https://fyl-unex.com/18th-century-spanish-shipwreck-has-17-billion-worth-of-coins-and-gems-on-board/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 20:11:38 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/18th-century-spanish-shipwreck-has-17-billion-worth-of-coins-and-gems-on-board/ The Colombian military has released images of one of the world’s most valuable shipwrecks, the location of which was unknown for nearly three centuries. spain San Jose The galleon was laden with a vast cargo of treasure when it was sunk by British naval vessels in 1708 during the War of the Spanish Succession. The […]]]>

The Colombian military has released images of one of the world’s most valuable shipwrecks, the location of which was unknown for nearly three centuries.

spain San Jose The galleon was laden with a vast cargo of treasure when it was sunk by British naval vessels in 1708 during the War of the Spanish Succession.

The ship, a 64-gun galleon with around 600 people on board, is believed to have carried at least 200 tons of treasure, including gold coins, silver coins and emeralds, worth an estimated $17 billion. at today’s prices.

Gold coins found in San Jose Shipwreck. (Armada of Colombia)

The wreck, often called “the holy grail of shipwrecks”, was discovered by Colombian navy officials off Cartagena in 2015, but its precise location has remained secret.

Colombian President Iván Duque released never-before-seen footage and images of the wreckage during a June 6 press conference.

The images revealed many newly discovered treasures, including Chinese ceramics, gold coins, swords and cannons.

Chinese dishes found in San Jose Shipwreck. (Armada of Colombia)

“The idea is to get it back and have sustainable funding mechanisms for future extractions,” Duque said at the press conference. “In this way, we protect the treasure, the heritage of the San Jose galleon.”

Authorities said the video and images were taken by advanced remote-controlled equipment which descended to about 3,280 feet to explore the nooks and crannies of the wreckage.

Markings on the guns revealed they were made in 1655 in Seville and Cadiz in Spain, Colombian Navy Maritime Director General Admiral José Joaquín Amézquita said in a statement.

He also noted the discovery of gold coins, or macuquinas, with coinage typical of the time.

Duque also said monitoring of the wreck led to the discovery of two other wrecks nearby, a colonial ship and a schooner dating to the 1800s.

A cannon found in San Jose Shipwreck. (Armada of Colombia)

The San Jose The wreckage has been the subject of a legal battle since its discovery, as reported The Economist.

Colombia has claimed the wreck and its contents, with former President Juan Manuel Santos signing the Submerged Cultural Heritage Law in 2013, which states that artifacts recovered from Colombian waters belong to the state.

However, Spain also asserted a claim, noting that the ship was theirs and citing the UNESCO convention on underwater cultural heritage.

To complicate matters further, many of the valuables on board the ship had likely been looted from South American countries, some of which may also claim a claim to some of the treasure.

This article was originally published by Business Insider.

Learn more about Business Insider:

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Etiology, treatments and outcomes of patients with C sever… : Critical care medicine https://fyl-unex.com/etiology-treatments-and-outcomes-of-patients-with-c-sever-critical-care-medicine/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 21:39:43 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/etiology-treatments-and-outcomes-of-patients-with-c-sever-critical-care-medicine/ 1 Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Massachusetts-Baystate School of Medicine, Springfield, MA. 2 Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH. 3 Center for Value-Based Care Research, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH. 4 Department of Infectious Diseases, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH. 5 EviMed Research Group, LLC, Goshen, MA. 6 Center for […]]]>

1 Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Massachusetts-Baystate School of Medicine, Springfield, MA.

2 Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH.

3 Center for Value-Based Care Research, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH.

4 Department of Infectious Diseases, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH.

5 EviMed Research Group, LLC, Goshen, MA.

6 Center for Health Services and Outcomes Research at the Institute of Public Health and Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.

seven Department of Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL.

8 Department of Medicine and Institute for Health Care Delivery and Population Sciences University of Massachusetts Medical School-Baystate, Springfield, MA.

9 Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH.

*See also p. 1153.

Additional digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal’s website (http://journals.lww.com/ccmjournal).

Supported, in part, by Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality grant R01 HS024277-01.

Drs. The institutions of Haessler, Deshpande, Imrey and Rothberg have received funding from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Dr. Guo revealed that he worked for pay. Dr. Deshpande’s institution received funding from the Clorox Company; he received funding from Merck & Co. Drs. Deshpande and Imrey received support for researching articles from AHRQ. Dr. Zilberberg has received funding from the Cleveland Clinic. Drs. Lagu and Lindenauer received paper research support from the National Institutes of Health.

For more information on this article, send an e-mail to: [email protected]

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‘Justice’ for Ukraine overshadowed by cost of living concerns, poll finds | Ukraine https://fyl-unex.com/justice-for-ukraine-overshadowed-by-cost-of-living-concerns-poll-finds-ukraine/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/justice-for-ukraine-overshadowed-by-cost-of-living-concerns-poll-finds-ukraine/ Europe’s unity in the face of the war in Ukraine is under threat as public attention increasingly shifts from the battlefield to cost-of-living concerns, according to a poll in 10 European countries, the gap is widening digging between voters who want a quick end to the conflict and those who want Russia punished. The survey […]]]>

Europe’s unity in the face of the war in Ukraine is under threat as public attention increasingly shifts from the battlefield to cost-of-living concerns, according to a poll in 10 European countries, the gap is widening digging between voters who want a quick end to the conflict and those who want Russia punished.

The survey in nine EU member states – Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Spain and Sweden – as well as the UK found that support for Ukraine remained high, but that concerns have shifted to the wider impacts of the conflict.

“The Europeans had surprised Putin – and themselves – with their unity so far, but the big stresses are coming now,” said Mark Leonard, co-author of a European Council on Foreign Relations (ECFR) report on the change of attitude towards Russia. invasion.

The ability of governments to retain public support for potentially harmful policies would be crucial, Leonard said, warning that the rift between the “peace” and “justice” camps could be “as damaging as that between creditors and debtors during the euro crisis”.

The survey found that despite strong support across Europe for Ukraine’s bid for EU membership and the Western policy of severing ties with Moscow, many European voters want the war to end as soon as possible, even if it means Ukraine losing territory.

This view often did not reflect the position of national governments, the authors said, warning European leaders against “maximalist positions” on the war and suggesting that they remain tough on Russia but cautious about the dangers of war. ‘escalation.

“At the start of the war, the countries of Central and Eastern Europe felt justified in their warmongering attitude towards Russia,” write Leonard and his co-author Ivan Krastev. “But in the next phase, countries like Poland could find themselves marginalized if the ‘peace’ camp widens its appeal to other member states.”

The poll, conducted between April 28 and May 11, found near universal support for Ukraine, with 73% of respondents in the 10 countries blaming Russia for the war.

Chart

More than 80% in Poland, Sweden, the United Kingdom (83%) and Finland (90%) say they hold Russia responsible, as well as strong majorities in Italy (56%), France (62%) and Germany (66%), while majorities or pluralities also saw Russia as the main obstacle to peace.

There was strong support for cutting ties with Russia. A majority in all 10 countries believed governments should sever economic and cultural ties with Moscow, with most – reaching 71% in Poland – also favoring an end to diplomatic ties.

Similarly, 58% in the 10 countries – rising to 77% in Finland – wanted the EU to reduce its dependence on Russian energy, even at the expense of the bloc’s climate goals, suggesting public support for a new round of EU sanctions, including on oil.

But the ECFR poll showed a clear split between Europeans who want peace as soon as possible (35% in the 10 countries) and those who want justice – defined as the restoration of the territorial integrity of Europe. Ukraine and Russia’s accountability (22%).

A third “swing” group, which shares the anti-Russian sentiments of justice supporters but also the peace camp’s escalation fears, accounted for around 20% of voters, according to the report – with large differences in the distribution between the countries.

chart

The peace camp – whose supporters also tended to believe that Ukraine would be worse off than Russia when the conflict ends – was most strongly supported in Italy (52%), according to polls, while the Poland had the largest justice camp, at 41%.

Fundamentally, opinions on the EU’s political response to the invasion varied depending on which camp the respondents were on, with justice voters supporting the severing of economic, diplomatic and cultural ties, and peace voters not arguing that the first of them.

Asked what worried them most about the war, respondents in Germany, Italy and France were most concerned about the cost of living and energy prices, while respondents in Sweden, UK and Poland were most concerned about the threat of nuclear war.

As the conflict drags on and the costs mount, governments will be increasingly forced to “balance the pursuit of European unity with divergent opinions both within and between member states”, write the authors, noting a “growing gap between the positions of many governments and the mood of the public in their respective countries”.

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US tourists caused $27,000 damage to Spanish Steps in Rome: police https://fyl-unex.com/us-tourists-caused-27000-damage-to-spanish-steps-in-rome-police/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 05:19:13 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/us-tourists-caused-27000-damage-to-spanish-steps-in-rome-police/ Two American tourists were caught rolling their scooters down the Spanish Steps in Rome on June 3. Their actions dislodged four inches of travertine and caused $27,000 in damage, authorities said. The couple were fined a total of €800 ($851), Rome police said in a press release. Loading Something is loading. Authorities have fined two […]]]>
  • Two American tourists were caught rolling their scooters down the Spanish Steps in Rome on June 3.
  • Their actions dislodged four inches of travertine and caused $27,000 in damage, authorities said.
  • The couple were fined a total of €800 ($851), Rome police said in a press release.

Authorities have fined two American tourists for damaging Rome’s iconic Spanish Steps, local police wrote in a Facebook post.

In video footage of the June 3 incident, a man can be seen rolling an electric scooter up the marble steps. A woman can be seen throwing her scooter down the stairs.

Their actions created scratches on the stairs and dislodged four inches of travertine, Rome’s Capitoline superintendence for cultural heritage wrote in a statement seen by Insider. The heritage office said it would cost €25,000 ($27,000) to repair the steps.

“The Superintendence will begin, as soon as possible, the work necessary to restore the damaged steps, which includes the arrangement of the work area, the cleaning of the surfaces, the consolidation of cracks and detachments, the stuccoing work , and the integration of damaged parts and final protective operations,” the cultural heritage office wrote in the statement.

The tourists in question are a 29-year-old man and a 28-year-old woman, according to a local police press release. The press release, which Insider viewed, did not list the names of the tourists. The pair were fined €800 ($851) in total.

The two tourists have been banned from visiting the Unesco heritage site for six months, according to Franco Pasqualetti, spokesman for Rome’s city council, The New York Times reported. Pasqualetti said the couple were “completely drunk” during the incident.

Rome City Council did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment.

The scooter incident comes weeks after police in Rome charged a man with aggravated damage to cultural heritage and monuments after driving his Maserati down the same stairs on May 14. Rome police apprehended the man at Milan Malpensa airport after locating him using CCTV footage and contacting the car rental company he used, Rome police wrote on Facebook .

The Spanish Steps in Rome.  They were built in 1725 and a popular tourist attraction.  The church of Chiesa della Trinita dei Monti is at the top.

The Spanish Steps were flooded with tourists sitting on the steps.

Julian Elliott Photography/Getty Images


The Spanish Steps, also known as Scalinata della Trinità dei Monti, is a popular tourist destination. In 2015, they underwent a €1.5 million restoration process, according to The Florentine. On July 8, 2019, Roman authorities passed an ordinance under which anyone caught sitting, eating or drinking on the steps can face fines of up to €400 ($425 ).

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Celebrate Filipino Culture at the 27th Annual Festival of the Philippines https://fyl-unex.com/celebrate-filipino-culture-at-the-27th-annual-festival-of-the-philippines/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 20:44:00 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/celebrate-filipino-culture-at-the-27th-annual-festival-of-the-philippines/ The Filipino American community in Colorado is hosting its 27th annual Philippine Festival on June 11-12, 2022. The festival, which commemorates the independence of the Philippines from Spain in 1898, is free, open to the public and features the best of our heritage: delicious cuisine, exciting music and dancing, and Filipino hospitality. Denver7 is proud […]]]>

The Filipino American community in Colorado is hosting its 27th annual Philippine Festival on June 11-12, 2022. The festival, which commemorates the independence of the Philippines from Spain in 1898, is free, open to the public and features the best of our heritage: delicious cuisine, exciting music and dancing, and Filipino hospitality. Denver7 is proud to support this event, which also features performances by guest artists, as well as concession vendors and fun activities for young people.

The Filipino American community in Colorado has a rich history of celebrating Filipino culture and heritage with the Denver metropolitan community. FACC hosts community events at Bahay Kubo (community center), performs at festivals across Colorado, and shares culture at Heritage Camp. Since the start of the COVID pandemic, they have also decided to use their resources to help those who need it most: seniors from all walks of life, people experiencing homelessness, French-speaking citizens second and those who experience food insecurity.

The 27th Annual Philippine Festival is a fundraiser for the FACC community to enable them to continue their programs. They are a 100% volunteer-run organization and are committed to serving their FACC members and our Metro Denver community.

“The 27th Annual Philippine Festival is the best way to celebrate our culture and build meaningful connections with all community members and partners,” said FACC President Vivian Egonio-Norman.

For more information or to pre-pay for food and beverages, visit www.colorado-filipinos.org.

FACC leaflet

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US tourists fined for damaging Rome’s Spanish Steps with scooters https://fyl-unex.com/us-tourists-fined-for-damaging-romes-spanish-steps-with-scooters/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 13:12:02 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/us-tourists-fined-for-damaging-romes-spanish-steps-with-scooters/ Editor’s Note – Subscribe to CNN Travel’s Newsletter Unlocking Italy for insider information on Italy’s most popular destinations and lesser-known regions to plan your ultimate trip. Plus, we’ll get you in the mood before you go with movie suggestions, playlists and Stanley Tucci recipes. Roma (CNN) — Two American tourists have been fined and briefly […]]]>
Editor’s Note – Subscribe to CNN Travel’s Newsletter Unlocking Italy for insider information on Italy’s most popular destinations and lesser-known regions to plan your ultimate trip. Plus, we’ll get you in the mood before you go with movie suggestions, playlists and Stanley Tucci recipes.

Roma (CNN) — Two American tourists have been fined and briefly banned from Rome’s historic city center after damaging the city’s Spanish Steps with electric scooters.

The incident, which was captured by security cameras, comes less than a month after a Saudi man was arrested for allegedly driving a rental Maserati sports car onto the 18th-century monument, also causing damage .

Police said the tourists, aged 28 and 29, were arrested by a patrol at around 2.45 a.m. local time on June 3 after a scooter was thrown down the steps, also known as a of Trinità de Monti.

“A couple of American tourists threw a scooter three times on the steps of Trinità dei Monti, damaging the penultimate travertine step of the second ramp on the side towards the rise of San Sebastianello,” said the Capitol Superintendency. from the city. the cultural heritage office said Thursday.

Catering expenses

Both men were fined.

Roma Capital Police

He said the incident dislodged a 10 centimeter (four inch) piece of marble and put the cost of the restoration at €25,000 ($27,000).

The two were fined 400 euros each, “in accordance with the provisions of the urban police regulations”, the police said.

The woman was also charged with filing a claim for damage to the property of a monument because at one point she deliberately threw the scooter she was riding down the stairs, police said.

The man and woman were banned from visiting the area around the steps for two days, police said.

In May, Border Police apprehended a 37-year-old Saudi man at Milan International Airport after a rental Maserati was driven down the stone staircase and abandoned.

The car caused two step fractures and “”widespread chips, scratches, abrasions”.

The Spanish Steps is one of Rome’s most famous landmarks. They owe their name to the Spanish Embassy to the Holy See which is housed in a palace in the square below.

A two-year, €1.5 million restoration of the monument – which has appeared in numerous films, including 1953’s ‘Roman Holiday’ starring Audrey Hepburn and Gregory Peck – was completed in 2015.

Top image credit: Roma Polizia Capitale

CNN’s Sharon Braithwaite and Livia Borghese contributed to this story

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Rome’s cultural elite write to Unesco for ‘mortifying’ littering scenes | Italy https://fyl-unex.com/romes-cultural-elite-write-to-unesco-for-mortifying-littering-scenes-italy/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 17:14:00 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/romes-cultural-elite-write-to-unesco-for-mortifying-littering-scenes-italy/ Cultural workers, artists, teachers and environmentalists living in Rome’s historic center have urged Unesco to remind the city council of its duty to protect the World Heritage Site as they denounced scenes’ mortifying” rubbish and other signs of degradation. In a letter to Lazare Eloundou Assomo, the head of the UNESCO World Heritage Centre, and […]]]>

Cultural workers, artists, teachers and environmentalists living in Rome’s historic center have urged Unesco to remind the city council of its duty to protect the World Heritage Site as they denounced scenes’ mortifying” rubbish and other signs of degradation.

In a letter to Lazare Eloundou Assomo, the head of the UNESCO World Heritage Centre, and signed by 150 people, the group said their complaints to authorities in the Italian capital had been ignored.

The entire historic center of Rome, home to treasures such as the Trevi Fountain, the Colosseum and the Spanish Steps, was inscribed on the coveted World Heritage List in 1980. However, various Roman administrations have had struggling to keep it clean, with the more recent “invasion” of bar and restaurant tables on the town’s cobbled streets and electric scooters adding to the woes.

The group argued the council was shirking its responsibility to conserve the site, calling on Unesco to push for “a turnaround”.

“Between the uncut weeds, the trash in the streets, and the noise, the overall scene is mortifying,” the band wrote in the letter.

The signatories of the letter evoke a time when the districts of central Rome were a pleasant place to live. Chiara Rapaccini, artist and widow of director Mario Monicelli, told Corriere della Sera: “We have lived in Monti since 1988 and made a documentary about the beauty of the neighborhood. Monti’s decadence hurts me, and it would have hurt Mario too.

Myriam D’Andrea, director of Ispra, the environmental agency, took issue with the electric scooters, which are often used and parked derelict. “They invaded the city in a completely wild way,” she said. On Sunday, two American tourists were each fined 400 euros for throwing an electric scooter in the Spanish Steps. A visitor from Saudi Arabia recently drove a Maserati up the 17th century staircase.

But the problems are not limited to the center – overflowing bins, graffiti and neglected parks are commonplace in Rome. Wild boars are often seen walking on the roads or searching for food in the garbage cans in the northern districts of the city.

Rome Mayor Roberto Gualtieri, who was elected last October, broke his promise to give the city an ‘extraordinary clean-up’ by Christmas but now says another 655 garbage collectors are being hired, the 155 first to start by the end of June. The board also approved the creation of a committee to work on “ensuring decorum”.

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Tenerife: The choker-draped Spanish island has Scottish ties beyond the flag https://fyl-unex.com/tenerife-the-choker-draped-spanish-island-has-scottish-ties-beyond-the-flag/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 04:01:39 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/tenerife-the-choker-draped-spanish-island-has-scottish-ties-beyond-the-flag/ As the familiar flag of St Andrew is hoisted on the mast of the ferry, I gaze up at the highest mountain in these islands and think of the hiking, great seafood and rich culture. It may seem so, but I’m not on CalMac. Scotland is not that I sail to Tenerife, an island massively […]]]>

As the familiar flag of St Andrew is hoisted on the mast of the ferry, I gaze up at the highest mountain in these islands and think of the hiking, great seafood and rich culture. It may seem so, but I’m not on CalMac. Scotland is not that I sail to Tenerife, an island massively popular with Scottish tourists that swims in conjunction with the country that shares its flag.

Tenerife is striking in many ways; for Scots, it’s impossible not to be struck by the Saltiers that float across the island, seen on everything from municipal buildings to the jerseys of the island’s football team. Over the years I have heard a number of theories as to why we share the same flag. The first is that its use in Tenerife began as a tribute to the Scots who fought the British in the Battle of Santa Cruz in 1797, the battle that cost Lord Nelson an arm.

Scottish links go back over the years. Many Scots drifted across the north of the island for centuries as trade grew with the ports of Santa Cruz and Puerto de la Cruz. Then, more recently, came tourism, the attraction of an island with an eternal spring climate, obvious to anyone who has experienced a Caledonian winter or a washed-out summer.

I have been to Tenerife over 20 times and feel very comfortable here. In Scotland, I start the day with porridge. In Tenerife, my breakfast cereals are sprinkled with gofio, a similar grain-based staple. Politically, there are also parallels. Tenerife is closer to Morocco than to Madrid and Tenerifos proudly has a distinct identity. We have devolution and they have semi-autonomous status. There is a desire for independence among some people here as well.

READ MORE: Moray Speyside offers glorious family holidays without a dram in sight

I don’t need to explain to Tenerife my love of the mountains – walking in the hills is ingrained in the very consciousness of the island, as it is in Scotland. We have Ben Nevis and Tenerife at Teide. This active volcano is the star attraction of Spain’s most visited national park, rising nearly three times the height of its Scottish sibling at 3715m, easily Spain’s highest mountain. And that’s where the appeal of Tenerife, beyond year-round sunshine and beaches for me, really comes in. The mountains here are bigger. Everything is bigger and brighter in Macaronesia. There are great theme parks – at Loro Parque, rated the most beautiful zoo in the world, and Siam Park, rated the best water park – but Tenerife is also a true Jurassic Park.

This miniature continent shares pine forests with Scotland, but also tropical forests and the ancient laurisilva. They have heather here, but their Erica arborea can grow up to 10m high!

The mountains of Tenerife will bring the Scots home

With each trip to Tenerife, I discover new aspects that make me think of Scotland. This time it’s thanks to Jose Maria, who works with El Cardón NaturExperience. I meet him at one of the island’s bountiful banana plantations and he shows me the “Shepherd’s Leap”, an incredible act of physical prowess used to negotiate this steep island.

My heart is in my mouth as I watch him jump off a high cliff using only the 3m long wooden pole he made himself. “There’s only one other place I’ve heard of people using this,” he smiles as he descends, “and that’s the Scottish Highlands.”

On this trip, I am staying on this remarkable island in four hotels; Scottish connections continue. At the lavish Gran Melia Palacio de Isora (melia.com), I savor Scottish smoked salmon during lunch on the terrace while gazing out over the Rum-esque island of La Gomera. “We get a lot of Scottish guests and our staff really like them because they’re so happy here,” Samantha Hernandez Galand from the hotel tells me.

In another of the best hotels on the island, the Royal Hideaway Corales Beach (barcelo.com), I meet Valentina Hernandez. She laughs: “I’ve heard of a lot of Scottish connections. We even have our own whisky. It is distilled in neighboring La Palma, but we add a smoky, peaty flavor to it. No one knows exactly where our original Guanches came from – it may have been Scotland!

The spacious four-star Marylanza (macaronesianhotels.com) is owned by a local man I’ve known for years. Jorge Marichal tells me: “I love active sports and our island and Scotland share a love for these and, of course, the mountains.”

READ MORE: Renewal of the Auld Alliance in Paris and Burgundy

My last night is in the simple three-star Aguamar which I booked through Olympic Holidays (olympicholidays.com). Just like Andy from Cupar, whom I met by the pool.

“I wondered about the Saltires, it makes sense now,” Andy says. “My wife and I were talking this morning about how at home we feel here and that so many things remind us of Scotland.”

I am then in good company with Andy. And with the 300,000 Scots who are drawn to this saltire-draped subtropical island every year.

Fact sheet: easyJet (easyjet.com) flies to Tenerife from Edinburgh and Glasgow. For more tourist information see webtenerife.co.uk

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Fifteen Loyola students win Gilman scholarships to study abroad – Newsroom https://fyl-unex.com/fifteen-loyola-students-win-gilman-scholarships-to-study-abroad-newsroom/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 14:03:14 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/fifteen-loyola-students-win-gilman-scholarships-to-study-abroad-newsroom/ June 1, 2022 | By Jessica Goldstein Fifteen Loyola University of Maryland students were awarded the Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship in the 2021-22 academic year, a record for the University. “Loyola University of Maryland is proud of our 15 Gilman Fellowship recipients, all of whom are highly gifted and dedicated students,” […]]]>


| By Jessica Goldstein

Fifteen Loyola University of Maryland students were awarded the Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship in the 2021-22 academic year, a record for the University.

“Loyola University of Maryland is proud of our 15 Gilman Fellowship recipients, all of whom are highly gifted and dedicated students,” said Terre Ryan, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Writing and Director of National Fellowships at Loyola. , which provides mentoring for the Gilman Fellowship. candidates. “Recipients are well deserving of this extraordinary opportunity to study abroad, gain perspectives from diverse cultures, and grow as Ignatian citizens ready to serve in this ever-changing world.”

Gilman Fellows include:

  • Esther Agyeman Badu, ’23, interdisciplinary major in information systems and data analytics; destination: Auckland, New Zealand, in fall 2022
  • Avinash “Avi” Ali, 23, majoring in finance with a minor in political science; destination: Paris, France, in May 2022
  • Louis Cuoco, ’24, double major in business economics and finance with a minor in Spanish; destination: Alcalá de Henares, Spain, in fall 2022
  • Dulce Diaz-Alvarenga, ’23, major in history with a minor in Latin American and Latin American studies
  • Sophie Ernst, ’24, major in forensic studies; destination: Thailand in fall 2022
  • Olivia Howley, 24, a major in global studies with minors in Asian studies and Chinese; destination: Singapore in fall 2022
  • Hajrah Jalil, 23, majoring in political science with a minor in environmental and sustainability studies; destination: Dubai, United Arab Emirates, in spring 2022
  • Nevaeh Lopez, 24, majoring in Global Studies with minors in Asian Studies and Gender and Sexuality Studies; destination: Hirakata, Japan, for the 2022-23 academic year
  • Meredith Lyttle, 24, a speech and hearing science major; destination: Copenhagen, Denmark, in fall 2022
  • Jack McCormick, ’23, a theology major with a business minor; destination: Amsterdam, Netherlands, in spring 2022
  • Jenna Miller, ’23, majoring in writing with a minor in acting
  • Ifeoluwa (Ifey) Olukemi, ’23, interdisciplinary major in philosophy and psychology; destination: South Africa in the fall of 2022
  • Julia D. Smith, 24, a major in speech and hearing sciences with a minor in special education; destination: Cork, Ireland, in spring 2023
  • Greer Soles, ’23, majoring in business administration with a major in marketing
  • April Varela, ’24, international business major; destination: Madrid, Spain, in spring 2023

Each of Loyola’s students has expressed a desire to live and study abroad to immerse themselves in different cultures, study other languages, and gain valuable skills and experience that will benefit their future careers.

“During my time abroad, I look forward to exploring Denmark and traveling to other parts of Europe that I have always wanted to see,” Lyttle said. “One of my goals abroad is to have as many experiences as possible.”

“Studying abroad and teaching in Amsterdam during the spring semester will broaden my understanding of the world and allow me to interact with others with a whole new mindset,” McCormick said.

“This experience will teach me a lot about myself and how I can be a better person in the world. I look forward to immersing myself in Spanish culture and gaining a new perspective of the world,” Soles said.

These 15 scholars add to the growing number of Loyola students who have received the award in previous years.

About the Gilman Scholarship:
The Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship eases the financial burden on outstanding U.S. undergraduate students studying or interning abroad. The Gilman International Scholarship Program is sponsored by the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the U.S. Department of State and administered by the Institute of International Education through its office in Houston, Texas.


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