Spain Culture – FYL UNEX http://fyl-unex.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 23:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://fyl-unex.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Spain Culture – FYL UNEX http://fyl-unex.com/ 32 32 Iñaki Williams: “Playing for Ghana brings me closer to my roots” | World Cup 2022 https://fyl-unex.com/inaki-williams-playing-for-ghana-brings-me-closer-to-my-roots-world-cup-2022/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/inaki-williams-playing-for-ghana-brings-me-closer-to-my-roots-world-cup-2022/ Jhere is a light in Kweku’s eyes. “It’s just amazing, crazy,” he says. “You see it from the outside and it’s amazing. You live it from the inside and it’s even more amazing. It’s like a masters. I learn something new every day and about myself too. I internalize more. There were things I didn’t […]]]>

Jhere is a light in Kweku’s eyes. “It’s just amazing, crazy,” he says. “You see it from the outside and it’s amazing. You live it from the inside and it’s even more amazing. It’s like a masters. I learn something new every day and about myself too. I internalize more. There were things I didn’t think about before and now I do.

It’s not just a World Cup. For Iñaki Williams, it’s transformative, life changing, a different man with a different name. Here is Kweku, born on a Wednesday. And he beams.

Back home, the two houses, his family too. Especially his proud 90-year-old grandfather, Richard, who made it possible. Through Doha, 11 km and a world away, so is his little brother Nico. Inseparable so far, teammates too, they made their international debuts a day apart but for different countries, Nico joining Spain while Iñaki, now 28, finally agreed to play for Ghana.

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“It allows me to get closer to my roots, to my culture, to what my parents instilled in me,” says Iñaki. “I’m proud of everything I see, experience, represent their country. I am very, very happy to have made this decision.

This shows. It also took a long time. Williams was 20 when his mother, Maria, finally told him the whole story: how she was pregnant with him as she and her husband, Felix, crossed the Sahara in a truck and barefoot, climbing the fence to the Spain. Born in Bilbao, he was part of the Athletic first team at the time, for whom he played 246 consecutive league games. He played once for Spain, in a friendly match in 2016, but resisted approaches from Ghana.

“I feel Basque and I can’t cheat anyone,” Williams said in October 2021, explaining he didn’t think it was fair to fill a spot belonging to another player for whom playing for Ghana was everything. “When the president of the federation came to Bilbao in March or April to convince me, I responded with the same words I told you. When I said that, I felt it. And part of I still feel it often.

What changed? Sitting here, listening to him, the answer seems obvious: everything. But that came later. First came the way here. “Until the arrival of the president, I had not had a real 100% chance. But I still said no. says the attacker. “They told me to think about it. I didn’t have to make up my mind overnight.

“I spoke to my parents and it made them happy to think that I play for the country where they come from, where they feel loved, where we have the family. But I wasn’t sure. I could miss important games for Athletic which could be a problem. You keep thinking, turn it around. Then Ghana reached the World Cup and I’m not going to lie it helps. But I still have to was unclear.

Iñaki Williams celebrates after Ghana's friendly victory over Switzerland just before the World Cup.
Iñaki Williams celebrates after Ghana’s friendly victory over Switzerland just before the World Cup. Photography: Laurent Gilliéron/EPA

Ghana was and they would not give up. “The coach [Otto Addo] called several times. They wanted to show me how enthusiastic they were, their affection for me, what a good footballer they thought I was. But I was still unclear until I moved to Ghana this summer with my parents, family and girlfriend. We went to see the country, the family in Accra and Kumasi. It was emotional, like the whole town was waiting when I got out of the car. It was amazing, amazing. And that’s where everything changed.

“That’s when I went to talk to my grandfather. I told him there was a chance I could play for Ghana at the World Cup and what did he think of it. He said straight away that he didn’t have long to live and that he dreamed of his grandson playing for Ghana. There was nothing more to think about then.

Richard told his grandson he could now die happy. “It was very emotional,” Williams says. “We never had a lot of personal contact. They were in Ghana, I was in Spain, although there were calls. Every time he talks about his grandson, he is filled with pride.

“I was afraid to make this decision because of what people there would think. What people thought in Spain didn’t bother me. I didn’t know that in Ghana they would consider me as one of between them. But there was no rejection anywhere. Every message was positive.

“I spoke to the captains: Jordan [Ayew]Thomas [Partey] and Daniel Amartey. I wanted their input because I didn’t want to cause any trouble and they were super responsive. Even people like Asamoah Gyan, Michael Essien, icons, got in touch to say how happy they would be if I joined them.

“I now know one of the reasons people smile in Ghana, and that’s football,” Williams says, but it goes deeper. He found a place, something new; he also found himself. He says he feels more Ghanaian now, right down to the name: “Everyone calls me Kweku in the national team, like my parents and my Ghanaian family. You get the name based on the day you were born.

If everything is different, there is a certain familiarity. From the language – his English is getting better by the day, according to federation staff – to the pre-match routines, to the music, even to the traditional attire Ghana wore when they arrived.

“My mom was happy with the photos,” Williams says, smiling. “That’s what Nico and I grew up with. I’m used to food too. I am a big fan of my mother’s Ghanaian rice. I love being part of this culture, being able to experience it here. I know a lot of songs because we used to sing in church for good luck. Others my parents used to sing to us when we were little. I can understand the language, Twi, and make myself understood.

“The locker room is totally different from Europe. At Athletic, we pray together, arms around our shoulders, but here it’s a step further with music, happiness, people dancing. A different atmosphere. This was a nice surprise. There are things I would like to bring back to the Athletic dressing room. Williams laughs. “I send videos to the [Athletic] team discussion. They think it’s amazing. The culture is totally different. I come from Europe, my friends are European, Basque. It brings me closer to my roots. »

Inaki Williams

Yours? “Yes,” he said. ” I talked to [club-mate] Óscar de Marcos on this subject. One of the things that stuck out to me the most was that I’m used to being in a box where, apart from me and my brother, they’re all white. Now looking to the right, to the left, to the guy in front, to feel that many have experienced something similar to you, that their childhood was not easy either or that their parents also had to emigrate, means that I feel identifies.

Ghana are in a group – along with Portugal, Uruguay and South Korea – where “you can be first, you can be last,” says Williams. He talks about Son Heung-min, Lee Kang-in, pokes fun at memories of being punched by Pepe, ‘one of the toughest defenders I’ve ever faced’, and defends Cristiano Ronaldo. “Lord of goals,” Williams calls him. “People didn’t always respect a player who gave so much to football, who many of us grew up admiring, watching his football, his magnificent goals, his tireless work.

But it’s Uruguay in the final group game that keeps them busy the most. “It’s a score to settle, I know, I know,” Williams said. “When the draw took place, I was reading people on Twitter, the knife already between the teeth. It’s a match circled on the fixture list. I hope we can reach it in six points, fighting for first place.

Cross over and the most familiar face of all may be waiting for you on the other side. The sooner Ghana could meet Spain, Inaki could meet Nico, in the quarter-finals. They’re in the same town but haven’t seen each other and it may be, Williams says, the longest time he’s gone without seeing the brother he practically fathered. He admits to asking Athletic and Spain goalkeeper Unai Simón to keep an eye on Nico. “But Nico is easy, there are young players he knows and from what he told me and what I saw he is having a lot of fun. I would like to have my brother here.

He would appreciate that too. “I really want to play against an African nation,” Williams said. “I understand that people may have doubts, but I am committed. Having the World Cup matters – I 1000 times prefer Ghana to be there – but I give my word: I will play African Nations, qualifying, everything, because I love football and I love wearing the jersey so much from Ghana.

For Williams, the World Cup is huge, but not an end in itself. Instead, it proved the beginning of something bigger, deeper. “A family arrived from Ghana this morning,” he said. “I hope to see them before I play, to hug them, to have them fill me with positive energy.

“I spoke to my grandfather and he’s so proud, he can’t wait for me to play. I miss my brother, but it’s for a good cause. It’s not every day that we play a World Cup. I will follow him, he will follow me and I hope that our paths will cross and that we can “paint their faces”, redo them.

“It would be amazing for two brothers to face each other at this level and I really hope it happens. God willing on December 9, my grandfather is sitting there watching the game, wanting me to beat Nico.

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Mizrahi Heritage Month: An Untold Story https://fyl-unex.com/mizrahi-heritage-month-an-untold-story/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/mizrahi-heritage-month-an-untold-story/ Editor’s note: Alexandra Ahdoot is a fellow for CAMERA on Campus, whose work is mentioned at the end of this article. The satisfying crunch of a piece of tadig at Friday night Shabbat dinner; the sweet aroma of a cup of freshly brewed cardamom tea; the flowing, melodic notes of a traditional Persian song. These […]]]>

Editor’s note: Alexandra Ahdoot is a fellow for CAMERA on Campus, whose work is mentioned at the end of this article.

The satisfying crunch of a piece of tadig at Friday night Shabbat dinner; the sweet aroma of a cup of freshly brewed cardamom tea; the flowing, melodic notes of a traditional Persian song. These are probably not the sights, smells and sounds that come to mind for most people when asked about Judaism. However, these key elements of Middle Eastern culture have undoubtedly shaped my identity as an Iranian Jew and are prevalent in my hometown of Great Neck, New York, which has a large population of Mizrahi Jews. But who are we exactly?

To answer this question, we must go back to 423 BCE, when Nebuchadnezzar, the king of Babylon, destroyed the Holy Temple in Jerusalem and exiled thousands of Jews to the land of Babylon. After the Persian conquest of Babylon, the Jews faced two more long periods under Persian and Greek rule, until Israel was taken over by the Roman Empire. And finally, in the first century AD, thousands of Jews were forced, again, to flee our native homeland, Israel, when the Romans destroyed the Second Temple and massacred much of the population. . This spurred a large Jewish diaspora, with many Jews settling in places like Western Europe – these Jews would later become known as Ashkenazim – and Spain, where those banished by King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella in 1492 would once again disperse around the world as Sephardim. The Jews. What goes unnoticed by many, however, is the small subset of Jews who ended up in different parts of the Middle East and North Africa region – the Mizrahim.

For centuries, Mizrahi Jews lived across the Middle East and North Africa, establishing communities that would each develop their own unique culture in the larger host countries, while simultaneously maintaining the constant dream of returning in Jerusalem. Some of the oldest and largest Mizrahi communities were in Babylonia (now Iraq), Persia (now Iran) and Yemen, and the Jews lived a rather uncertain and ever-changing life. in these nations: we prospered but suffered, assimilated but remained isolated. , and contributed positively to Arab and Muslim society even when we were treated as “dhimmis”, or second-class citizens. On the whole, however, the Jewish people had a real life in these countries, with families, homes and jobs.

However, in the two decades following Israel’s War of Independence in 1948, more than 850,000 Jews were banished from the Middle East. As numerous documents, bills and statements made by delegates show, several countries simultaneously coordinated the implementation of repressive measures and discriminatory treatment against Jews in order to expel us. Forced to leave our whole lives behind, the Mizrahi Jews had very few places we could move to on such short notice, but the only place we were guaranteed a welcome with open arms was Israel. Still a poor country and newly established on the international stage, Israel had just received an influx of European immigrants after the Holocaust, but its leaders were not in phase. Not only were Mizrahi Jews allowed to return, but Israel encouraged our immigration and even rescued some Mizrahi populations in covert operations because Israel has always been and always will be the homeland of our people. Nearly 600,000 Mizrahi Jews immigrated to Israel between 1948 and 1972, bringing with us the rich culture of these lands. Since then, this Mizrahi rocket has profoundly influenced Israeli culture, whether through food, music or slang terms.

So while many of the country’s key visionaries and founders were Ashkenazi, Israel is quite a vibrant and diverse melting pot – something that has become even more evident after welcoming hundreds of thousands of Mizrahi immigrants and refugees. Today, more than half of Israeli Jews are of Mizrahi origin and come from countries in the Middle East.

In the wake of the Iranian Revolution, thousands of Persian Jews, including my own family, also had to flee their country amid growing anti-Semitic persecution. Many have found refuge in Israel. While my immediate family lives in America, I still have many cousins ​​in Israel as a result of this migration, and I couldn’t be more grateful for how Israel has accepted us all with open arms. Simultaneously, the Mizrahi community around the world has proliferated and flourished over the years, including in my home town of Great Neck, New York.

I’ve been blessed to grow my whole life around a strong Persian Jewish community, but upon arriving at Duke as a freshman in August 2021, I had the eye-opening revelation that Mizrahi Jews are largely underrepresented on campus. Most students, Jewish and non-Jewish, don’t know what it means to be Mizrahi, and how people with backgrounds like mine play into the greater tapestry of Judaism. Many students who see Israel as a “white, colonizing and colonial project” deliberately ignore the heritage of my people and the contributions we have made to Israeli society, while others simply do not know our history yet. .

Thus, it seems particularly fitting that during Mizrahi Heritage Month, I shed light on this nuanced subset of Judaism that looms so large in my life and also characterizes millions of Jewish experiences around the world. I hope that all of us – students, campus cultural organizations and administrators – will take the initiative to learn more about the incredibly rich history of my people. CAMERA on Campus’ Mizrahi Stories campaign provides opportunities to learn more about Jewish communities that aren’t often talked about. This makes it easier to connect with others and not only hear their stories, but also build authentic relationships. By harnessing my Mizrahi pride, I will educate and empower others as we honor the simultaneous diversity and unity of Jews everywhere.

Alexandra Ahdoot is a second-year Duke student studying public policy and economics.

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Where to drink vermouth in Madrid https://fyl-unex.com/where-to-drink-vermouth-in-madrid/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 05:00:15 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/where-to-drink-vermouth-in-madrid/ FT Globetrotter is launching a new Madrid guide this week. Follow us as we publish a new article every day about the best of the Spanish capital Before living in Spain, I made a big mistake: I didn’t like vermouth. I considered it a simple cocktail ingredient and, with its bitter, dry taste, relatively low […]]]>

FT Globetrotter is launching a new Madrid guide this week. Follow us as we publish a new article every day about the best of the Spanish capital

Before living in Spain, I made a big mistake: I didn’t like vermouth. I considered it a simple cocktail ingredient and, with its bitter, dry taste, relatively low in the hierarchy of drinks. The wine empire keeps growing, tequila never goes out of style, and beer is the ultimate refreshment. But the vermouth? Who would drink vermouth alone?

Then I arrived in Madrid and everything became clear.

The city isn’t the birthplace of vermouth – the drink’s origins date back to ancient Greece and early Chinese dynasties who celebrated it for its supposed medicinal properties (it’s meant to calm the stomach). But Madrid is undoubtedly one of the best places in the world to consume it, where it is served neat, chilled or on ice, and garnished with orange or lemon. And while you can drink vermouth at virtually any bar here, it’s the specialty taverns that stand out.

Vermuterias are scattered throughout the city – often small, intimate, historic taverns highly prized by locals as ideal spots to let time slowly slip away to the sound of ice cream. These are often traditional bars with an increasingly young and trendy clientele.

In fact, for several decades after Francisco Franco’s death, much of Spain recoiled against traditions, including vermut time (vermouth time), which usually arrived just before Sunday lunch.

But now the vermouth has a moment again, and it has converted me into a fan of this aromatic, fortified and delicious wine, with its powerful load of plants, herbs, fruits and spices.

In vermuterias, the aperitif can be served on tap or from dozens of bottles from different producers. The bars aren’t just rekindling Spain’s deep-rooted love of drinking; they also bolster the country‘s vermouth culture, in all its icy, orange-peeled, bittersweet glory.

Casa Camacho

Calle de San Andres 4, 28004 Madrid

  • Good for: A real vermuteria experience in a five-generation family establishment

  • Not so good for: Sitting and drinking slowly. Standing at the bar, that’s what this place is

  • FOR YOUR INFORMATION: As a sign at Casa Camacho explains, singing is strictly forbidden. One of the owners said, “If you want to sing, go to karaoke. If you want to dance, go to a club. It’s a vermouth bar. He added: “The singing here is very bad anyway.” So if you’re in a musical mood after a few Yayos, you should take it outside

  • directions (no website)

Casa Camacho opened in the 1920s

Casa Camacho owner Miguel Ángel Gonzalez Pérez behind his bar, with small barrels on the wall to his left

The barrels on the walls of the bar – seen here behind owner Miguel Ángel Gonzalez Pérez – were once used to sell alcohol on the street

If you want a local feel for an inimitable corner of Madrid, you can’t beat Casa Camacho. Located in the trendy Malasaña district, this cramped bar has been serving vermouth since the 1920s. The interior design seems virtually unchanged since then — save for a flat-screen TV, microwave, and refrigerator. a cash register. The barrels hung on the wall, steeped in history, were once used to sell alcohol in the street. And cramped means cramped: you have to go out of limbo under the bar to get to the toilet.

Casa Camacho is not the kind of place that serves a wide range of vermouths. Instead, it offers a vermouth menu consisting of precisely three items: solo, vermut soda Where typical vermut.

Two glasses of vermouth on a table at Casa Camacho

Casa Camacho serves vermouth three ways

Shelves stacked with wine bottles above a blackboard with 'Vermouth' and 'Yayos' written on it

The house specialty of the bar is the yayo: vermouth, sparkling water and gin

This last option is also known as Yayo, a house specialty that is a mixture of sparkling water, vermouth and gin. It sits at the dry, bitter end of the vermouth scale, dangerously easy on the tongue, with an effervescent head and served without ice. If you want a snack to keep the drink company, Casa Camacho offers impeccable dried anchovies, eggplant pickles, olives and ham.

Latazo

Antón Martín Market, Calle de Santa Isabel 5, 28012 Madrid

  • Good for: Sip Spanish vermouths while admiring the beautiful vegetables on sale in the market

  • Not so good for: Eat tapas or snack. Food choice is limited

  • FOR YOUR INFORMATION: In the camaraderie of the market, you’ll likely find yourself chatting to the Spanish group at the next table over their favorite vermouth.

  • Website; directions

Madrid’s markets – and their wide variety – are among the city’s gems. They differ from neighborhood to neighborhood and sell almost everything from socks to baby artichokes.

    Three glasses of vermouth photographed from above in Latazo

Three of Latazo’s vermouths

    Roger, the owner of Latazo, standing in front of a blackboard

Roger González de Vera, owner of Latazo. His jewel bar is in the city’s Antón Martín Market

Installing a vermuteria inside a market is also one of Madrid’s best innovations. Take the Antón Martín Market to the heart of the city, with its little food stalls, grocery stores and bars – just about everything Madridians need for the weekend. He hosts the Latazo vermuteria, a joint with only three tables but many types of vermouth. These include drinks from all over Spain, but also a few Italian variations, perhaps a friendly gesture towards a fellow Mediterranean. Servers are very knowledgeable about the vermouths they serve and are keen to explain which varieties suit which tastes (for example, Spanish vermouths are often darker and a bit sweeter than Italian). A favorite is El Gato Orgulloso, or The Proud Cat (“cat” being slang for an authentic Madrileño), which strikes a good balance between bitterness and sweetness. This is served, like Latazo’s other offerings, in a bulb-shaped wine glass filled with ice.

Taberna La Concha

Calle de la Cava Baja 7, 28005 Madrid

  • Good for: Artisanal vermouth and large portions of delicious tapas. Bacalao with caviar salsa is a must

  • Not so good for: Hot days when you want to have a drink on the terrace

  • FOR YOUR INFORMATION: “La Concha” and “Manuela” both have a sexually suggestive double meaning, but everyone behaved when Globetrotter came calling.

  • Website; directions

    La Concha's house specialty of vermouth, gin and Campari in a martini glass

La Concha’s house specialty is vermouth, gin and campari. . .

    A cutout of Humphrey Bogart on the wall of La Concha

. . . is called Manuela (“open your taste buds to appreciate its nuances”)

It’s a bar with a mission. Taberna La Concha aspires to elevate Madrid’s vermouth culture in style. The tavern is located in La Latina, a lively nightlife district, and its owner, Francisco Rosas, is a vermouth producer himself. Instead of just serving vermouth from other producers, he searches for the perfect blend to serve his customers. Its house brand is called, perhaps unsurprisingly, La Concha.

La Concha owner Francisco Rosas is also a vermouth producer La Concha owner Francisco Rosas at the door of his bar

La Concha owner Francisco Rosas is also a vermouth product

A fish tapas on a glass plate at La Concha

Soak up the bar’s artisanal vermouth with its delicious tapas

The owners, servers and customers of this small vermuteria are all vermouth aficionados. His house vermouth specialty is called Manuela and is served in a triangle-shaped martini glass with an olive on a toothpick and an orange twist. A touch of gin and Campari is added to make it drier and more bitter. It is too full-bodied to be called a cocktail; you have to open your taste buds to appreciate its nuances.

The violet

Calle de Vallehermoso 62, 28015 Madrid

  • Good for: Sip your vermouth on the terrace with generous portions of olives and tapas

  • Not so good for: Spanish foodies – it’s mostly bar food

  • FOR YOUR INFORMATION You can have two glasses of vermouth and a small plate of tapas for less than €10

  • Website; directions

Two vermouths and a tapas for less than €10 at La Violeta

The interior of La Violeta

The bar is in the trendy district of Chamberí

La Violeta is serious about its vermouth. Located in the bohemian-bourgeois district of Chamberí, this local vermuteria is as authentic as it gets, buzzing with great music and serving vermouth to its relatively young clientele.

The management team is also young, determined to offer sanctuary to vermouth connoisseurs. The bar offers over 30 different brands of vermouth. The menu even ranks them on a bitter-to-sweet scale to guide vermouth lovers, while grading their strength.

A bottle of red vermouth on a table at La Violeta

On its menu, La Violeta classifies its vermouths on a scale from bitter to sweet.

    A bartender behind the counter at La Violeta seasoning a plate of tapas

The bar has a relatively young staff and clientele

The drinks themselves are grouped by red, white and Reserve vermouths and range from extremely dry sweetness to desert wine sweetness. But none are likely to break the bank. The reservations go from €3.50 to €4 a glass.

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Poems in Spanish, Mandarin and Turkish https://fyl-unex.com/poems-in-spanish-mandarin-and-turkish/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 03:08:01 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/poems-in-spanish-mandarin-and-turkish/ All said and done too, Speaking in Tongues is, all the way, a travel book. A journey through life; a journey, in different ways, around the world. A broadening of horizons, an exploration of the interior and the exterior. A series of moving poems, in more than one sense of the word. Kiran BhatRed River, […]]]>

All said and done too, Speaking in Tongues is, all the way, a travel book. A journey through life; a journey, in different ways, around the world. A broadening of horizons, an exploration of the interior and the exterior. A series of moving poems, in more than one sense of the word.

Kiran Bhat
Red River, August 2022
215 pages, ₹349

The cover of Kiran Bhat’s Speaking in Tongues: Poems in Spanish, Mandarin and Turkish features a 17th century painting, from the Deccan, of ‘The Fabulous Creature Buraq’. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, in its annotation, describes the Burak like the beast on which the Prophet Muhammad made his night journey (from Mecca to Jerusalem and back) as a fantastical being with the face of a beautiful woman and a body made up of an array of creatures. Look closely at the cover, and you may see birds of several species; a leopard; a hare; deer, what looks like a lion, even an elephant.

This is only a representation of the Burak, and it is not the only one. He is often depicted as a white horse, with mighty wings: wings, and the stamina of a horse, to go to the ends of the earth and back.

Deccani paint, however, is more appropriate. On the one hand, it is linked to Kiran Bhat’s own origins in the Deccan Peninsula. On the other hand, the hodgepodge of creatures that form the chimerical Burak here is so much more interesting than just a celestial horse. This diversity speaks in many languages ​​– and yet together, merged into one being, there is a dissonance that is, perhaps paradoxically, also a harmony.

In this sense too, Burak the painting is appropriate: it reflects the various languages ​​(four of them, including English) that make up this collection of poems. And, as a symbol of an epic journey, the Burak reflects the poet’s love of travel, a love that is central to many of these poems.

speaking in tongues comprises three distinct sections. The first part, Autobiographyconsists of poems in Spanish (each poem preceded by its English translation) that trace the life of the author, from his birth in 1990 to 2019. The poems in this section, one poem per year of Bhat’s life, give an intimate glimpse of his childhood, his coming of age, the joys and sorrows so universal but so personal, so individual too.

These verses are not necessarily autobiographical, as prose can be: there are few events here, few landmarks in the passage of the years. There is an anniversary, and there is the fear of the year 2000; but almost all the rest of this section concerns moments which mark the poet’s progression, the dawn of understanding. His realization that he, born to Indian immigrants, is somehow different from his teachers and classmates; the realization, as he gets older, that his sexual orientation is different from what most people around him would consider ‘normal’. The first tentative step to acknowledging that he is gay; is the anxiety of coping with the resulting backlash. The move to New York and the freedom it affords him; the journeys that shape the poet: all these elements together offer an overview of the poet’s life as seen through his own eyes:

Become something between foreign and local
become a nameless existence
Act like the traveling honey fly
side to side
observe
listen
writing
but never fully becoming one thing or another
become fully myself.
(Since 2011)

This philosophical trend dominates the second section of the book, Kiran Speaks. Originally written in Mandarin, these poems grew out of what Bhat describes in the introduction to the section as a comparison of Chinese culture with Indian. While working as an English teacher in Shanghai, Bhat came to ‘realize the differences and similarities between China and India’and reflections on these manifest in the form of these poems, inspired both by the Talks of Confucius and by the writings of prominent Bhakti poets of Hindi literature.

These poems are brief, invariably taking the form of a dialogue. Someone – a writer, an apprentice, a stranger, a frog, Kiran’s boyfriend, Kiran’s mother, Kiran himself, many others – asks a question. A question that can be simple (“Why do I create art?”) or deeply profound, enigmatic, without possible answer (“Who is your God?”). This is followed by the response, what Kiran said. These are among the most deeply insightful poems in the collection, peeling back the layers of the poet’s character and laying him bare (or as bare as he will allow himself to be). Part of it is pure philosophy, the kind of world-embracing, knowledge-seeking wisdom so true of poets like Kabir and Tulsidas. Much of it, however, offers a refreshing approach to philosophy: a more practical course, a more worldly and somehow more real look at life. To the mother who asks if he doesn’t love her, for example, there is the uncomfortable but genuine truth offered as an answer:

I love my mother
Thank you for giving me love
For giving me the means to grow.
But oil and wine cannot mix.
No matter how much a tree supports its branches
If the tree is too close to the roots of others
Young trees perish and die.
(Excerpt from My Mother Asks: Don’t You Love Me?)

Bhat’s understanding of human nature, of what makes people who they are and who they are, also shines through with great intensity in the book’s third and final section, The Book of Travels. Each of these poems, originally written in Turkish, speaks of a country that Bhat inhabited, and who inhabits it, in his own way. They are not hymns to natural beauty, history or culture; they don’t travel brochures written in verse. Instead, these poems are often hard-hitting, brutally honest truths about peoples, lands, nations. And yet, they manage to strike a chord; Bhat is adept at discovering what makes a country what it is, or how its reality may differ from the perception others have of it.

…and we want the whole world for ourselves
for any reason
although we know that it is not ours either.

So we try
we try so hard
we are so wrong
we fail so hard

because we want to be seen.

Sometimes the softer words are easier to hear.
(From China)

Whatever the theme of the poems in speaking in tongues there is an honesty that marks each work. Bhat is outspoken and fearless, his poetry burning.

Also interestingly, he often refuses to color in the lines. The three sections of this book are sometimes ready to use. The poems in Autobiography, for example, are not just about his life, but about impressions, thoughts, and even spaces that are not strictly Bhat growing. While Kiran Speaks is the philosophy section, there is just as much philosophy (even if presented in an unconventional way) in The travel book. And the most memorable travel poem in the entire book, 2013, is part of Autobiography rather than The Book of Travels.

It’s all been said and done too, speaking in tongues is, throughout, a travel book. A journey through life; a journey, in different ways, around the world. A broadening of horizons, an exploration of the interior and the exterior. A series of moving poems, in more than one sense of the word.

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Finalists for Victoria’s New Restaurant of the Year Announced https://fyl-unex.com/finalists-for-victorias-new-restaurant-of-the-year-announced/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 21:52:57 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/finalists-for-victorias-new-restaurant-of-the-year-announced/ Two cross-currents shape Melbourne’s cuisine, both represented among the finalists for The Age Good Food Guide 2023 New Restaurant of the Year Award. One of the trends is the thirst for luxury as Australia experiences another Roaring Twenties, resulting in dens of pleasure such as South Yarra’s Yugen and CBD restaurants Warabi and Grill Americano. […]]]>

Two cross-currents shape Melbourne’s cuisine, both represented among the finalists for The Age Good Food Guide 2023 New Restaurant of the Year Award.

One of the trends is the thirst for luxury as Australia experiences another Roaring Twenties, resulting in dens of pleasure such as South Yarra’s Yugen and CBD restaurants Warabi and Grill Americano. But a different, quieter movement is also accelerating.

A handful of foreign-born chefs are opening restaurants where they combine their immigrant upbringing with a keen sense of Australian culinary culture, whether it’s the Filipino roots that underlie Serai in the CBD or Lao influences at Jeow in Richmond.

Yugen literally sparkles with gold, thanks to an intelligent lighting system Photo: Sam Davis



This weaving of undiluted flavors from a chef’s homeland with modern Melbourne sensibilities is an exciting development for Australian cuisine at the moment, says Besha Rodell, Good Food’s chief restaurant critic, who describes the trend as a salvage kitchen.

“It’s about taking the flavors and techniques of traditional immigrant dishes and reclaiming the narrative, not to appeal to Western tastes or to impose an idea of ​​extreme authenticity, but to express the experiences of chefs whose identities are tied to more than one country or culture,” she says.

“They say, this is my food, this is my representation of it and it’s no less authentic than someone who cooks strictly authentic dishes in the Philippines, because that’s what has been my life.”

At Warabi, only 29 guests can bask in the rarefied atmosphere typical of Japanese gastronomy.

At Warabi, only 29 guests can bask in the rarefied atmosphere typical of Japanese gastronomy. Photo: Bonnie Savage



At Serai, chef Ross Magnaye picks influences from his upbringing in Davao City, in the southern Philippines, and his time working and dining in contemporary Melbourne restaurants. This results in dishes such as kangaroo kinilaw, a type of raw dish similar to ceviche.

Rodell is happy to see chefs such as Magnaye breaking the binary between “authentic cuisine” and “fusion cuisine”. “It’s a really false distinction, because it completely discounts the very authentic lived experience of people growing up with their feet in two cultures.”

At Richmond’s Jeow, chef-owner Thi Le honors Lao restaurants in suburban Sydney and Melbourne, where she’s eaten almost every week since she was a child.

The Vietnamese-Australian chef closed her Southeast Asian-owned restaurant Anchovy in June to make way for Jeow. This allowed him to devote himself to Lao flavors, alongside quality products from suppliers such as Great Ocean Ducks.

“I’m sure if I was cooking next to a Laotian aunt, she would say: Thi, what are you doing?” she jokes. “But I’m not saying it’s 100% authentic.”

Regional newcomer Chauncy’s menu is a passport to chef-owner Louis Naepels’ French upbringing, his Italian cooking prowess honed at Grossi Florentino, and his time in Spain’s Basque country. The trip prompted Naepels and his partner Tessa Murray to move from Melbourne to Heathcote to be closer to their vegetable suppliers.

The Grill Americano features premium cuts of beef on the menu, silver service, and a marble and leather dining room.

The Grill Americano features premium cuts of beef on the menu, silver service, and a marble and leather dining room. Photo: Luis Enrique Ascui



Yugen, Warabi and Grill Americano, meanwhile, have tapped into a different vein now supporting catering in Melbourne.

Yugen, tucked away in the din of Chapel Street, literally sparkles with gold, thanks to a clever lighting system. There’s a star-studded cage for small groups overlooking the dining room, an upscale six-person sushi bar, and a menu studded with status symbols.

Culinary director Stephen Nairn thinks this escape is a magnet. “I think diners are now able to separate what is just a good, enjoyable meal and what was actually an experience.”

At Jeow, chef-owner Thi Le celebrates Laotian restaurants in the suburbs of Sydney and Melbourne.

At Jeow, chef-owner Thi Le celebrates Laotian restaurants in the suburbs of Sydney and Melbourne. Photo: Bonnie Savage



At Warabi, only 29 guests can bask in the rarefied atmosphere typical of Japanese gastronomy. The $245 menu showcases several techniques, with luxury at every turn, from wagyu to foie gras. Grill Americano also attracts pleasure-seekers, with several prime cuts of beef on the menu, backed by silver service and a dining room defined by marble and leather.

If there’s a unifying force between glam and next-gen fusion, it’s that Melburnians are in for a good night out.

New Restaurant of the Year Finalists

Chauncy

Regional newcomer Chauncy's menu is a passport to chef-owner Louis Naepels' French upbringing.

Regional newcomer Chauncy’s menu is a passport to chef-owner Louis Naepels’ French upbringing. Photo: Simon Schluter



178 High Street, Heathcote, chauncy.com.au

American grill

112 Flinders Lane, Melbourne, grillamericano.com

Jewish

338 Bridge Road, Richmond, jeow.net.au

will be

Racing Club Lane, Melbourne, serakitchen.com.au

Warabi

408 Flinders Lane, Melbourne, warabimelbourne.com

Yugen Restoration

605 Chapel Street, South Yarra, yugendining.com.au

The Good Food Guide 2023 The magazine is on sale from November 15 for $9.95 from newsagents and supermarkets or for pre-order at thestore.com.au.

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Excavators discover artifacts at the site of the last Maya stronghold https://fyl-unex.com/excavators-discover-artifacts-at-the-site-of-the-last-maya-stronghold/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 09:26:13 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/excavators-discover-artifacts-at-the-site-of-the-last-maya-stronghold/ Published on: 29/10/2022 – 11:26Amended: 29/10/2022 – 11:24 Flores (Guatemala) (AFP) – Ceramics, human burial grounds and bullets from Spanish rifles are among the artifacts that have been uncovered by archaeologists in Guatemala at the site of the last Maya city to resist European conquest, officials said Friday. The new excavation project began last June […]]]>

Published on: Amended:

Flores (Guatemala) (AFP) – Ceramics, human burial grounds and bullets from Spanish rifles are among the artifacts that have been uncovered by archaeologists in Guatemala at the site of the last Maya city to resist European conquest, officials said Friday.

The new excavation project began last June with the aim of better understanding the outpost of Tayasal where Mayan inhabitants first settled in 900 BC during their preclassic period, l archaeologist in charge of the excavations.

Tayasal was the last Mayan city to yield to Spanish conquest in 1697, a century after Europeans entered the western highlands of present-day Guatemala, Suarlin Cordova said.

“More than 100 years passed in which the northern part of Guatemala was totally outside Spanish rule, and this happened mainly because the jungle functioned as a natural border that made the arrival of the Spaniards in these very difficult places.”

An expert works at the Tayasal archaeological site in the municipality of Flores, about 500 kilometers north of Guatemala City CARLOS ALONZO AFP

In 1525, Tayasal was also part of the route taken by Spanish conquistador Hernan Cortes on his journey to present-day Honduras.

Most of the buildings at the Tayasal site are buried under earth and vegetation in a seven square kilometer area near Lake Peten Itza.

Among the partially exposed structures at the site is a 30-meter-tall acropolis which, according to research, served as the residence of the ruling elite.

The vast area has major Mayan archaeological value
The vast area has major Mayan archaeological value CARLOS ALONZO AFP

Also visible is a water well used since pre-Hispanic times.

One of the goals of the project is to showcase the site so that tourists can better “appreciate” the Mayan archaeological value of the vast area, said Jenny Barrios of the Guatemalan Ministry of Culture and Sports.

The Maya civilization reached its peak between 250 and 900 AD in what is now southern Mexico and Guatemala, as well as parts of Belize, El Salvador, and Honduras.

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The mournful moos of a grieving cow just broke Spain’s noise laws https://fyl-unex.com/the-mournful-moos-of-a-grieving-cow-just-broke-spains-noise-laws/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 10:21:12 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/the-mournful-moos-of-a-grieving-cow-just-broke-spains-noise-laws/ A 15-month-old cow called Carmina mooed so loudly after her mother died that a farmer has been fined €300 for breaking Spain’s noise laws. Carmina’s moo apparently reached 74 decibels, almost 20 decibels above the maximum noise limit of 55. The limit applies in the immediate vicinity of residential properties. The fine was imposed after […]]]>

A 15-month-old cow called Carmina mooed so loudly after her mother died that a farmer has been fined €300 for breaking Spain’s noise laws.

Carmina’s moo apparently reached 74 decibels, almost 20 decibels above the maximum noise limit of 55. The limit applies in the immediate vicinity of residential properties.

The fine was imposed after Siero’s neighbors were unable to bear Carmina’s mourning any longer. An anonymous resident said the mooing continued for weeks in December 2021. This was disputed by the farmer, named Robert Pandiello, who claimed she could be heard for only “a few days”.

“We never thought this could happen”

Pandiello responded to the fine with disbelief. He claims Carmina was mooing due to an accelerated weaning process, after her mother had to be ‘deposited’. Pandiello made the statement to the local TV channel RTPA. However, he gave no explanation as to why the mother cow was killed.

Speaking about the fine, he said: “We thought it could never happen because it’s ridiculous; it’s a joke.”

“We had no idea this could happen. We can justify it by the circumstances, although it seems ridiculous to have to justify the mooing of a cow.

He added that there have always been farm animals in the rural area. Pandiello is currently considering an appeal.

Cows have “unique souls”

Carmina’s noise levels may have been unusual for the area, but grieving cows on farms are not uncommon.

Cows are sensitive animals that are believed to be able to remember events in their lives for long periods of time. Additionally, they have been shown to be emotionally intelligent, exhibiting behavioral and physiological changes when affected by external stimuli.

PETA reported that cows are capable of mourning the loss of loved ones. In addition to mournful moos, they may cry tears of sadness. The mother-calf bond is believed to be particularly strong, with both parties becoming visibly upset when separated. This applies even when the two are separated for a very short period of time.

Individual cow personalities have been observed by many people involved in farm animal rescue, including actor Joaquin Phoenix. After helping save two cows from a slaughterhouse in 2020, he commented, “there was clearly a unique soul in there.”

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“Cincinnati, thank you for an unforgettable season!” A letter from controlling owner and co-CEO Carl H. Lindner III https://fyl-unex.com/cincinnati-thank-you-for-an-unforgettable-season-a-letter-from-controlling-owner-and-co-ceo-carl-h-lindner-iii/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 17:24:48 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/cincinnati-thank-you-for-an-unforgettable-season-a-letter-from-controlling-owner-and-co-ceo-carl-h-lindner-iii/ Three years ago, after our inaugural season in MLS, I wrote a post-season letter to our fans in which I declared that FC Cincinnati was made to win – and pledged to be a winning team again. . I didn’t expect it to be so hard to get there. Thank you for your patience and […]]]>

Three years ago, after our inaugural season in MLS, I wrote a post-season letter to our fans in which I declared that FC Cincinnati was made to win – and pledged to be a winning team again. . I didn’t expect it to be so hard to get there. Thank you for your patience and continued support as we overcame a poor transition to MLS and restarted our football leadership this year.

Looking back to the start of 2022, as we entered our fourth season in Major League Soccer, we did so with three core values ​​in mind, the same values ​​we promised when we launched our franchise ago seven years. We always aim to be: 1) family friendly, 2) visible in the community, and 3) a winning team.

This season has been a success on all three fronts. We clinched our club’s first berth in the MLS Cup playoffs and earned our first playoff victory against the New York Red Bulls! When we hired Chris Albright as General Manager and hired Pat Noonan as Head Coach, they were tasked with reshaping the culture of this team and setting new winning standards that will guide us as the team moves forward in the future. We are grateful and blessed for the impact Chris, Pat and their staff have had on the team this year.

You, our incredible supporters, have been the foundation on which this has all been built. You have endured a difficult few years, and we are proud to have finally delivered exciting and winning football results in a successful MLS season. Your loyalty is greatly appreciated.

The energy at TQL Stadium this season was electric. The presence, passion and unwavering support of our fans created a great atmosphere in the stadium, which helped fuel the outstanding performances of a young and hungry team. This enthusiasm contributed to prestigious recognition on the world stage, with TQL Stadium named “Best Venue of 2022” by the World Football Summit in late September at an awards ceremony in Madrid, Spain.

We have set new records at all levels this season. We got 46 points, the most in club history and the biggest season-over-season increase in the league. We scored 64 goals, fourth-best in MLS, including the night no one will forget, our 6-0 win over the San Jose Earthquakes on September 10. We are grateful and excited by our exceptional players.

Our performance on the field has earned league-wide and international recognition for many of our players, who have etched their names in the history books of FC Cincinnati and Major League Soccer. Our captain, Luciano Acosta, led the league with 19 assists, and he and Brandon Vazquez were named to the 2022 MLS All-Star Team, the first FC Cincinnati players to earn the honor. Vazquez and Brenner became the first teammates in MLS history to score 18 goals in a season, and Brenner was one of three finalists for MLS Young Player of the Year.

I thank God, our talented management team and our exceptional employees for a successful season. Thank you to our fantastic partners, Mercy Health, TQL, First Financial Bank, Procter & Gamble, Kroger and the many others who have been with us this season. Without your financial support, our success would not be possible.

As we celebrate the success of this past season, this is just the beginning. We haven’t finished building. We haven’t finished improving. We continue to focus on improving your stadium experience, bringing competitive players to Cincinnati and growing our youth academy program and new MLS Next Pro team – all important contributors to further solidifying the culture. winner of this club.

Cincinnati, thank you for an unforgettable season! We are excited about the future.

Many thanks and appreciation,

Controlling owner and co-CEO

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Spain: Will a damaging dispute have lasting consequences? https://fyl-unex.com/spain-will-a-damaging-dispute-have-lasting-consequences/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 05:52:44 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/spain-will-a-damaging-dispute-have-lasting-consequences/ A Spanish fan holds a sign calling for coach Jorge Vilda to resign ahead of their friendly win over the United States After winning the Women’s Ballon d’Or for the second straight year on Monday, Spain midfielder Alexia Putellas was quickly brought down to earth with questions about the fallout that left her national team […]]]>
A Spanish fan holds a sign calling for coach Jorge Vilda to resign ahead of their friendly win over the United States

After winning the Women’s Ballon d’Or for the second straight year on Monday, Spain midfielder Alexia Putellas was quickly brought down to earth with questions about the fallout that left her national team in disarray.

“All I’m going to say today about the national team is that obviously it’s a subject that makes me very sad,” the Barcelona captain said.

“I think we have to talk about it, but today is not the day. It’s a day of celebration, a historic day, and that’s it.”

Last month, the Spanish Football Federation (RFEF) claimed that 15 members of its national team had said they would quit unless head coach Jorge Vilda quits.

This was later denied by the players, who were told they would not be selected for international duty unless they apologized.

Putellas, 28, currently absent with a serious knee injuryhas previously expressed his support for those involved – including Spain captain Irene Paredes, top scorer Jenni Hermoso and midfielder Aitana Bonmati, who came fifth in this year’s Ballon d’Or.

With just nine months until the 2023 Women’s World Cup, BBC Sport takes a closer look at the explosive row which could have detrimental consequences for women’s football in Spain.

What are the main issues?

It is understood the players first raised concerns over training methods, inadequate game preparation and training decisions at Euro 2022, where the squad reached the last eight before lose to eventual winners England.

Spanish journalist Maria Tikas, who writes for national daily Sport, told BBC Sport players that “the results of recent years do not reflect the level of the team”.

Since Vilda’s appointment in 2015, Spain have failed to get past the quarter-finals of a major tournament. They have won around 70% of their matches under Vilda.

At the same time, the Barcelona team, consisting mainly of Spanish players, shone in club football, successively reaching the Champions League finals.

Tikas said there was a general feeling in Spain among fans and journalists that “the federation’s commitment to women’s football is not real and not enough”.

“Players notice a lot of differences between training sessions with their clubs and the national team, as well as many practices that are ‘inappropriate’,” Tikas added.

“They didn’t like that the federation renewed Vilda’s contract until 2024 a few days before the Euros. The message sent was that whatever the outcome of the Euros, Vilda would continue to lead.”

Tikas believes there have been examples of players joining the national team and starting games after recovering from injury – despite medical advice – and a lack of rotation affecting player wellbeing.

Will the situation improve before the World Cup?

Jennifer Hermoso, Alexia Putellas and Aitana Bonmati
Jennifer Hermoso (left), Aitana Bonmati (centre) and Alexia Putellas (right) are among the top Barcelona players affected

Following statements from the RFEF and the players, Vilda told reporters: “I’m deeply hurt. It’s an unfair situation that nobody deserves. I think it’s ridiculous on a global scale.

“This mess is hurting Spanish football. It’s a global embarrassment.”

Hermoso later described the situation as the “The worst moments in the history of women’s football in Spain”.

Vilda was forced to name a depleted squad for matches against Olympic finalists Sweden and world number one United States in October, ruling out 14 members of his previous selection. However, Spain still managed a 1-1 draw and a 2-0 win respectively.

Tikas said these results “advantage” Vilda and the new players.

Nine of the squad members selected for these friendlies came from Real Madrid, and it has been suggested that there is a split between Barcelona and Real players, but Tikas doesn’t believe it.

“There are Real Madrid players who agree with them. However, their club told them not to be part of the group that sent the email and to go with the national team. they were called,” she added.

“I don’t think it’s a separation between Barcelona and Real Madrid players, but it looks like it.”

It is clear that a division has arisen, however, between some of the players and coaching staff and the federation.

“The team that [played in] the last international window is good, but Vilda only trusts them because they are with him,” Tikas said.

“Some of the players involved [Alexia Putellas, Jenni Hermoso and Irene Paredes] are among the best players in their position. Of course, not having them at the World Cup will hurt Spain’s chances.”

Tikas said the situation was “unsustainable” and would likely come down to RFEF president Luis Rubiales’ choice to support Vilda or the players.

“Rubiales will always choose Vilda before anyone else,” Tikas said.

What is the level of support for Vilda?

Jorge Vilda
Jorge Vilda oversaw a draw against Sweden and a win against the United States in October

There was a positive reaction to Vilda’s appointment in 2015 after 30 years under Ignacio Quereda, leading to players publicly airing grievances against a alleged culture of fear and intimidationexternal link.

Vilda has had success with Spain’s youth teams, including two gold medals in the U17 Women’s Euro, leading to a nomination for Fifa’s Coach of the Year in 2014.

However, Vilda had not managed a senior team before his appointment, and as women’s football grew in Spain, Tikas said many began to question whether he was “good enough to be in charge”.

“The federation has so much confidence in him because he is very close to President Rubiales, and he is also the sporting director of the RFEF women’s national team system,” Tikas added.

Reaction to the current situation has been mixed in Spain, Tikas said, with many who have followed the team for years not surprised by the latest developments.

“I’m disappointed because this situation happened when Spanish women’s football was at its best and it’s definitely a step backwards,” she added.

“I see what England are doing and I feel envy.

“I think a lot of changes need to be made and the players should always be listened to and their opinion taken into account.

“The players concerned should have talked more and explained their reasons. They don’t want to talk and I think that’s a mistake. Many media are just reporting on one of the parties.”

BBC Sport has contacted the RFEF for a response.

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Study abroad programs receive record number of applicants https://fyl-unex.com/study-abroad-programs-receive-record-number-of-applicants/ Mon, 17 Oct 2022 20:59:41 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/study-abroad-programs-receive-record-number-of-applicants/ Senior Sydnee Levett had a solid foundation in Spanish, but she also knew she would never master the language unless she had to speak it constantly. This led Levett — a double major in biology and Spanish — to spend the fall in Buenos Aires, Argentina, as part of the University of Miami’s study abroad […]]]>



Senior Sydnee Levett had a solid foundation in Spanish, but she also knew she would never master the language unless she had to speak it constantly. This led Levett — a double major in biology and Spanish — to spend the fall in Buenos Aires, Argentina, as part of the University of Miami’s study abroad program, ULatin America.

“Having in-person conversations and hearing how people converse with you in everyday interactions is what I was really looking for,” said Levett, a Singer Fellow and Foote Fellow currently living with an Argentinian host family. “I had never been to South America before.”

Levett is one of many University of Miami students eager to learn outside the United States this year and experience new cultures, study at historic libraries, and visit world-famous landmarks.

“The idea of ​​traveling, or even just leaving your home, was unimaginable during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, so I think more people are realizing how special an experience like this can be,” said Aleksandra Peeva, a young health student. management and politics, and global affairs in Edinburgh, Scotland this year.

More than 400 students have applied to study abroad programs for the upcoming spring semester, which typically has around 300, according to Devika Milner, assistant dean and director of Study Abroad.

“I am delighted for several reasons. Firstly, because we understand how disappointing the COVID-19 period has been when students have not had the opportunity to study abroad, and also because we are seeing renewed interest in programs of experiential learning,” Milner said.

Although the deadlines for spring semester study abroad programs have passed, Milner and his staff hope the surge in student interest in their programs will continue well into the summer. Several new faculty-led summer programs have recently been added to the roster for 2023, including one in Florence, Italy for biomedical engineering students; a Jewish studies program in Spain; and an entrepreneurship program in Israel. Summer programs have application deadlines of February 1, 2023.

“Data shows that students who study abroad will stand out when applying for graduate school or jobs,” Milner said. “These experiences will not only help them become more proficient in the marketplace, but also students going abroad become more cross-culturally fluid, which is something American students should always strive for.”

UBarcelona and URome are the two programs that currently have the highest number of participants for the spring. With more than 100 applicants, Barcelona garnered the highest number of enrollments in the history of the university’s study abroad program, just one year after its launch.

“Many University of Miami students recognize the value of stepping out of their own comfort zone, living somewhere completely new, and maybe learning a new language,” Milner said.

Peeva wanted a challenge like this when she decided to spend the whole academic year in Edinburgh. The Jupiter, Florida native always wanted to study abroad in college — it even inspired her to major in global business. Although she had a few bumps, found an apartment and figured out the student visa process, Peeva said she felt supported by University staff and was happy with her decision.

“I came to Edinburgh in 2019 and loved the city, the old buildings and the feeling of being in a completely different world from Miami,” she said. “When I was thinking about where to go, the UK was at the top of my list and Edinburgh was my favorite place in the UK. It was probably the best decision I’ve ever made, at least recently. There are a lot to learn and experience while studying abroad, and I think that’s what makes it so unique.

Learn more about study abroad programs and their information sessions.




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