Spain Culture – FYL UNEX http://fyl-unex.com/ Tue, 21 Sep 2021 19:37:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://fyl-unex.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Spain Culture – FYL UNEX http://fyl-unex.com/ 32 32 This yoga instructor teaches virtual classes in Spanish to reach new communities https://fyl-unex.com/this-yoga-instructor-teaches-virtual-classes-in-spanish-to-reach-new-communities/ https://fyl-unex.com/this-yoga-instructor-teaches-virtual-classes-in-spanish-to-reach-new-communities/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 19:05:38 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/this-yoga-instructor-teaches-virtual-classes-in-spanish-to-reach-new-communities/ Meet Mariana Fernández, a New York-based Peloton instructor who teaches yoga in Spanish to attract more Spanish-speaking students to her virtual classroom. After completing her graduate studies in New York, Fernández moved to Mexico City where she began teaching yoga in Spanish. When she returned to New York, she wondered if she could teach her […]]]>

Meet Mariana Fernández, a New York-based Peloton instructor who teaches yoga in Spanish to attract more Spanish-speaking students to her virtual classroom.

After completing her graduate studies in New York, Fernández moved to Mexico City where she began teaching yoga in Spanish. When she returned to New York, she wondered if she could teach her Peloton yoga classes in Spanish and English. According to the statistics of Zippia.com, of the more than 21,000 yoga instructors in the United States, 77% of them are white.

“I wanted to find ways to bring yoga to the Latinx community,” Fernández said. Good + Good. “When I interviewed at Peloton, they asked me if I was teaching in other languages, and when I said I was teaching in Spanish, it opened up this whole new world. I asked myself, ‘Why don’t we do both? Why don’t I bring lessons in my native language to this huge Latinx community that we have among our members? It was the opportunity of a lifetime. “

In addition to teaching yoga in Spanish, Fernández also gives his students a full experience playing Spanish music that reminds him of Mexico, including mariachi songs. She wants students to feel welcome and provide “visibility and access” to a community that has not been supported in the fitness industry.

“One important thing for me is figuring out how to make yoga, as a practice, more accessible, and get people to open up a little more to it and explore how they move and what parts they like,” says Fernández. . “I try to keep the elements, the philosophies and the practices of yoga – the meditation, the breath, the movement, the awesomeness – as well as giving it my own style and effect.”


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BBVA targets young talents to reduce the gender gap in science https://fyl-unex.com/bbva-targets-young-talents-to-reduce-the-gender-gap-in-science/ https://fyl-unex.com/bbva-targets-young-talents-to-reduce-the-gender-gap-in-science/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 05:54:56 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/bbva-targets-young-talents-to-reduce-the-gender-gap-in-science/ Although male stereotypes dominate science and technology, the reality is that these fields are increasingly diversifying and more and more women are gradually taking up technical jobs. Today February 11, on the occasion of the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, four professionals from the Engineering and Organization unit of BBVA share their […]]]>

Although male stereotypes dominate science and technology, the reality is that these fields are increasingly diversifying and more and more women are gradually taking up technical jobs. Today February 11, on the occasion of the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, four professionals from the Engineering and Organization unit of BBVA share their point of view on how to break down barriers and engage more young girls in technology professions.

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For the Jews of Mallorca, their first “public” sukkah is a triumph over the Spanish Inquisition https://fyl-unex.com/for-the-jews-of-mallorca-their-first-public-sukkah-is-a-triumph-over-the-spanish-inquisition/ https://fyl-unex.com/for-the-jews-of-mallorca-their-first-public-sukkah-is-a-triumph-over-the-spanish-inquisition/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 19:07:40 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/for-the-jews-of-mallorca-their-first-public-sukkah-is-a-triumph-over-the-spanish-inquisition/ (JTA) – Before the Spanish Inquisition, the island of Mallorca had a large Jewish community. Every fall the island is dotted with leaf-roofed huts for Jews to erect on the feast of Sukkot. But that all changed under the Inquisition’s campaign of persecution that began in 1488 (four years before it began on the Spanish […]]]>

(JTA) – Before the Spanish Inquisition, the island of Mallorca had a large Jewish community. Every fall the island is dotted with leaf-roofed huts for Jews to erect on the feast of Sukkot.

But that all changed under the Inquisition’s campaign of persecution that began in 1488 (four years before it began on the Spanish mainland) and was not officially abolished until centuries later in 1834.

This year, however, the island’s small Jewish community in the capital Palma is determined to reintroduce its Sukkot tradition with a public statement.

Ahead of this week’s holiday, the Jewish community and the Municipality of Palma erected what organizers are calling the island’s first “public” sukkah since the Inquisition, located in the city’s former Jewish quarter.

“This is one of the first for the Jews of Mallorca, and it is particularly significant because it restores something from the past of this community,” said Dani Rotstein, founder of Limud Mallorca and secretary of the Jewish community of the Balearic Islands. A tourism and video production A professional from New Jersey, he has led efforts to promote Mallorca’s Jewish community since moving there in 2014.

To be fair, Palma has seen its share of the sukkah since the Inquisition. The town and island, which is a popular holiday destination off the eastern coast of Spain, has for decades had a small but active Jewish community of around 100 members, as well as several Jewish expatriates. They celebrate the 50th anniversary of the founding of the community by British expatriates in 1971. Palma also has a synagogue, a small Jewish museum and a resident rabbi.

But this year’s Sukkot holiday week, which begins Monday night, will mark the first time that a Sukkah will be built on public land with funding from the local municipality. It was erected at the Ca’n Oms mansion, seat of the city’s culture department and other municipal bodies. Jews and non-Jews alike will enjoy Limmud Mallorca’s cultural programming, including sukkah lectures and tours of the area, for two weeks.

The public sukkah is part of a European-wide initiative European Days of Jewish Culture, a series of events celebrating Jewish heritage in dozens of cities across Europe each year in September and October.

Members of the Jewish community in Mallorca, Spain attend a picnic in Tu b’Shvat on February 10, 2019 (Cnaan Liphshiz)

This development is the latest in a series of steps by Rotstein and others to commemorate the presence of Jews in Mallorca before the Inquisition, who have come to be known as chuetas, the local name of anusim – or those who were forcibly converted to Christianity during the Inquisition. .

On Rosh Hashanah, local Jews organized a festive service and a musical concert to celebrate the Jewish New Year, with the cooperation of a local Catalan cultural center, in its garden located in the old Jewish quarter.

It was symbolic for the participants due to a painful chapter in the history of the Jewish community in Mallorca. In 1677, local crypto-Jews, who risked their lives practicing their faith while pretending to be Christians, held a secret Yom Kippur service in a garden outside the city walls.

Local Jews say that when Spanish leaders learned of the service’s existence, they salted the soil in the garden to make sure nothing could grow there again, and redoubled their efforts to stamp out Jewish celebrations of the island.

In recent years, the authorities have made efforts to recognize and redress these atrocities.

In 2018, local authorities unveiled a commemorative plaque in Plaza de Palma where 37 crypto-Jews were publicly burned in what was once known locally as “the bonfire of the Jews.

In 2015, the city helped build a small Jewish museum in what was once the Jewish Quarter. The neighborhood, with its sandstone facades and quiet cobblestone streets, was once a thriving and strongly Jewish shopping and business district, with numerous tanneries, shoe shops, and butchers. Today few or no Jews live there, and most visitors are tourists.

Also in 2015, the parliaments of Spain and Portugal pass laws that give descendants of Sephardic Jews the right to citizenship. Millions of dollars of public funds are invested in the preservation and development of Jewish heritage sites in these countries.

Many Chueta families continued to practice Judaism in secret. Even those who did not maintain their Jewish practice at the time were treated with suspicion and excluded in many ways from the rest of society.

Some Jewish traditions have remained in Chueta families, such as lighting candles on Shabbat, covering mirrors during mourning, and spring cleanings associated with Passover. But over time, the island’s Jewish population declined.

But, ironically, the exclusion of the chuetas by society proved to be the key to the revival of Judaism in Mallorca, historians say: because they were not allowed to marry freely with the Christian population, the chuetas got married to each other. This helped preserve a distinct chueta identity until the 1970s, when the dictatorship of Fransisco Franco finally collapsed, opening up Spanish society to the rest of Europe.

When this happened, there were thousands of people in Mallorca who identified themselves as chuetas, a minority that today numbers around 20,000.

In recent years, the chuetas who returned to Judaism and converts took the reins of the community. In 2018, two chuetas were elected to the four-person executive council of the community. And in June, the community received, for the first time since the Inquisition, a rabbi born in Palma to a Chueta family, Nissan Ben Avraham.

This process, along with the public events of Rosh Hashanah and Sukkot, “is a victory,” said Iska Valls, a chueta repatriated to Judaism and the wife of Toni Pinya, one of the members of the board of trustees of Judaism. the chueta of the Jewish community. .

“It’s a victory [over] the Inquisition and proof that we are like a phoenix, rising from its ashes, ”she said.


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Why Mariana Fernandez de Peloton organizes courses in Spanish https://fyl-unex.com/why-mariana-fernandez-de-peloton-organizes-courses-in-spanish/ https://fyl-unex.com/why-mariana-fernandez-de-peloton-organizes-courses-in-spanish/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 00:04:50 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/why-mariana-fernandez-de-peloton-organizes-courses-in-spanish/ AAt the end of each of her yoga classes, Peloton instructor Mariana Fernandez offers her students classic Spanish. sobremesa. The word – which has no English equivalent – describes the post-meal period when people spend time together chatting and sharing with each other. “We move together and we sweat, then we end up in a […]]]>
AAt the end of each of her yoga classes, Peloton instructor Mariana Fernandez offers her students classic Spanish. sobremesa. The word – which has no English equivalent – describes the post-meal period when people spend time together chatting and sharing with each other.

“We move together and we sweat, then we end up in a sobremesa and talk about how it made us feel, the parts we connected with, what it reminded us of, whether at home, someone’s grandmother or growing up, ”says Fernandez , who introduced the tradition to her students when she began teaching on the Peloton earlier this year. “It’s that lovely way to think and see how some of these lessons really resonate with you.”

As a first-generation immigrant – her family moved from Mexico to San Diego when she was seven – Fernandez’s LatinX roots have become an integral part of her yoga practice. “I wondered how people could come together beyond the mat, so I started to implement my own cultural elements,” she says.

As a 5,000-year-old Indian tradition, yoga has its own full range of cultural elements. But in recent decades, the rise of fitness stores has seen the industry whitewash: 77.1% of yoga teachers in the United States identify as white, according to a 2021 survey. Representation of BIPOCs (Blacks, Aboriginals, People of Color) in these spaces has made people of color feel that they are not welcome in practice.

“For those who are BIPOC, that means walking into a studio often becomes an experience of not seeing any body that looks like theirs, being in the minority, not seeing yourself in the teacher and feeling altered – no centered – in a practice it’s supposed to act as a connective tissue between all people, ”said previously Rebeckah Price, yoga teacher and co-founder of The Well Collective. Good + good. This sense of “other” for people of color, especially those in the LatinX community, is something Fernandez tries to change by bringing aspects of his own Mexican heritage into his classes.

After receiving her teacher training certification while in New York Graduate School in 2009, she moved to Mexico City where she began teaching yoga in Spanish. “When I returned to New York City, I was looking for a way to teach in both languages ​​because I wanted to find ways to bring yoga to the LatinX community,” she says. “When I interviewed at Peloton, they asked me if I was teaching in other languages, and when I said I was teaching in Spanish, it opened up this whole new world. asked, “Why don’t we do both? Why don’t I bring lessons in my native language to this huge LatinX community that we have among our members?” It was the opportunity of a lifetime. “

In the months that followed, Fernandez brought his bilingual classes — and the sobremesas following them — to the 4.4 million Platoon members. “Being able to speak the language I grew up in at my job is not only a gift, but I think it provides visibility and access to a giant community in this country,” she says. “People who spoke the language with their parents, or who are first or second generation, feel culturally connected to cadence, vocabulary and expressions.”

In addition to teaching in Spanish, Fernandez also orchestrates his classes with traditional music that reminds him of his home. “All of a sudden people hear the sounds of Mariachi music, which is a Mexican staple,” she says. “And even if you’re not Mexican, a lot of people in Latin America grew up with Mariachi music, so it hits that ‘nostalgia’ button and reminds them of their childhood.”

Above all, Fernandez’s priority has always been to make students feel welcome in his space. “A great thing for me is figuring out how to make yoga, as a practice, more accessible, and get people to become a little more open and explore how they move and what parts of it they like,” explains Fernandez. “I try to keep the elements, the philosophies and the practices of yoga – the meditation, the breath, the movement, the awesomeness – while giving it my own style and effect.”

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Commonpoint Queens’ virtual cultural arts speaker series returns next month – QNS.com https://fyl-unex.com/commonpoint-queens-virtual-cultural-arts-speaker-series-returns-next-month-qns-com/ https://fyl-unex.com/commonpoint-queens-virtual-cultural-arts-speaker-series-returns-next-month-qns-com/#respond Sun, 19 Sep 2021 16:00:33 +0000 https://fyl-unex.com/commonpoint-queens-virtual-cultural-arts-speaker-series-returns-next-month-qns-com/ Sign up for our PoliticsNY newsletter for the latest coverage and to stay informed about the 2021 elections in your district and across New York As part of Commonpoint Queens’ virtual lineup, the nonprofit announced the return of a series of Zoom speakers early next month. The organization’s fall 2021 virtual cultural arts program kicks […]]]>